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Thread: Only have 110 volts, can I use my oven?

  1. #11
    SCOTTRODS's Avatar
    SCOTTRODS is offline Metal Finishing Guru
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    Default Re: Only have 110 volts, can I use my oven?

    Quote Originally Posted by FigureLLC View Post
    we originally had the same problem. Our solution was to take a natural gas oven (we got it free off of craig's list) and change it over to propane. That process consisted of 1) flipping a piece in the oven regulator from "ng" to "lp" -$0, 2) screwing the orifice at the burner down tight -$0, and 3) changing the gas line so we could connect a 20lb lp tank, like for a grill ~$20. Worked great.
    That is Genius !

  2. #12
    leitnin is offline New User
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    Default Re: Only have 110 volts, can I use my oven?

    Hi guys,

    First post here, I've been doing some reading.

    Not trying to hijack the thread but I wanted to run with the propane idea.

    I thought of the same thing when a friend got a new stove and I had to convert it back from propane.

    I have plenty of power coming to the house, but I was more interested in using propane in an old oven for this.

    My question is. I have seen very very many powdercoating suppliers etc. who say to never use a gas stove.

    I would assume due to powder dust combustion.

    Is this really that much of a concern? Can you reliably use a gas oven converted to propane? after all, Im not planning to spray powder in the chamber.

    Thanks!!!!

  3. #13
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    Default Re: Only have 110 volts, can I use my oven?

    Quote Originally Posted by leitnin View Post
    Hi guys,

    First post here, I've been doing some reading.

    Not trying to hijack the thread but I wanted to run with the propane idea.

    I thought of the same thing when a friend got a new stove and I had to convert it back from propane.

    I have plenty of power coming to the house, but I was more interested in using propane in an old oven for this.

    My question is. I have seen very very many powdercoating suppliers etc. who say to never use a gas stove.

    I would assume due to powder dust combustion.

    Is this really that much of a concern? Can you reliably use a gas oven converted to propane? after all, Im not planning to spray powder in the chamber.

    Thanks!!!!
    In recent threads on this forum and another I frequent,, it has been said that some powders actually put off a gas while curing, that can be explosive.

    Gas ovens are the thing to use for comercial powder coatingicon, but they are of the "no open flame" type. In other words, none of the typical household ovens should be used as they all have the "open flame" burners where the flame and the explosive gases can mingle.

    If you have an oven that is confirmed "enclosed flame" then it will be perfectly OK and should be of no harm at all.

  4. #14
    goodguy is offline New User
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    Default Re: Only have 110 volts, can I use my oven?

    I ran across your post, if you still need this done it can be safely done using the existing circuit. Your garage circuit should be 20 amps it could be 15 or even 30. Check in your breaker box to find out.

    Here how you can do this.
    Your oven has two elements bake and broil. They are rated roughly:
    Bake element: 2000W 30 Ohm 220V 9A
    Broil element: 3000W 45 Ohm 220V 13.5A

    The oven is powered by two hot 120v wires in different phases this gives you 240V. L1=120 L2=120
    The oven controls and lights are powered by 120V coming from L1.

    Use a decent gauge extension cord, or just buy a plug to connect to the back of the oven.



    Here is what you do -
    SUGGESTED BUT OPTIONAL: Remove or disconnect the broiler (top heating element) Make sure to insulate the wires.

    Hot wires are: black and red. Neutral is white and ground is green or bare.
    Connect them accordingly black to black, ground to ground, neutral to neutral. Then tie the red wire to the neutral.
    Basically your connecting the wires according to color the only difference is you tie the red wire to the white.

    This will power up your oven. Your oven is now running at 50% power and without a broiling element. Use only the bake function. Your oven will now heat up 2-3x slower. However, you should be up to 350 degrees within 15 minutes anyways.

    Now you are running one heating element. The new rating is 1000W 120v 30Ohms 4.5A.

    If you choose to keep the broiler it will be
    1500w 45 Ohm 110V 6.75A

    The oven will heat up faster but the load will be greater. 11.25A on your circuit. The broiler is used 25% of the time in the bake function of the oven.

  5. #15
    ed_denu is offline Metal Finishing Guru
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    Default Re: Only have 110 volts, can I use my oven?

    Quote Originally Posted by goodguy View Post

    This will power up your oven. Your oven is now running at 50% power and without a broiling element. Use only the bake function. Your oven will now heat up 2-3x slower. However, you should be up to 350 degrees within 15 minutes anyways.

    Now you are running one heating element. The new rating is 1000W 120v 30Ohms 4.5A.
    Welcome to the forum Goodguy, but your calculation is incorrect. Powering an element rated for 240 volts on 120 volts will give you 25% of the wattage, not 50%. (Ohms Law)

    The only way to know for certain what the wattage of the element is, is to do an ohms check. Assuming you have a 2000 watt element designed for 240 volts input it should have a resistance of 28.8 ohms. If you power this element with 120 volts the output wattage will be only 500 watts at 4.17 amps. The calculation for power(wattage) is: Current squared - divided by - resistance or ((120*120) / 28.8) = 500

    Regardless, I would never suggest this solution for a garage using a power cord as it's main power source.
    Last edited by ed_denu; 02-03-2009 at 08:35 PM.

  6. #16
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    Default Re: Only have 110 volts, can I use my oven?

    This is exactly my problem. I have a 30 amp fuse running a line of romax out to the garage and have an electric oven and was wondering if i could use it on 120 volts. I just thought the oven element went to a 120 v line and the broiler went to the other one. Im going to try to wire it and hope it works lol..Thanks..

  7. #17
    ed_denu is offline Metal Finishing Guru
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    Default Re: Only have 110 volts, can I use my oven?

    Quote Originally Posted by insomniacshotrods View Post
    This is exactly my problem. I have a 30 amp fuse running a line of romax out to the garage and have an electric oven and was wondering if i could use it on 120 volts. I just thought the oven element went to a 120 v line and the broiler went to the other one. No, see below. Im going to try to wire it and hope it works It will work, but at a reduced output as noted below. lol..Thanks..
    Oven elements run on 240 volts for each element(red to one side, black to the other). You can run either or both on 120 volts(one hot 120 volt feed to one side and a neutral to the other), it's just that you only get 1/4 the wattage output.

    Elements are just big resistors, they will output heat regardless of the voltage applied. The more voltage, the more heat!

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