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Will close contact parts bond during the anodizing process?

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  • Will close contact parts bond during the anodizing process?

    Say I have a tightly wound aluminum coil. Will the windings of the coil bond with each other from anodizing? If so, how strong is that bond?

    For context, this is a desirable condition for my project. If the windings don't bond I'll need to powder coat or epoxy dip. I'd want to maximize this bond if it exists.

  • #2
    It's is my opinion that the anodic crystals are too small to create a bond with each other to any degree worth considering, however, with that said, the outer layer of windings will be quite rigid and resist some bending once anodised. There will not be crystal growth on the non-exposed aluminium, so even the second layer will not grow crystals unless there is sufficient contact with the electrolyte.

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    • #3
      Rigid may work for me. I'm trying to make a coil that, under normal use, won't flex like a spring coil. This is going to be worth experimenting with. Thank you for weighing in.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by BCN View Post
        I'm trying to make a coil that, under normal use, won't flex like a spring coil.
        Then I think you will be disappointed, The anodic coating is brittle so any flexing will cause the coating to crack to a point that it becomes compromised.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by gardinhackle View Post
          Then I think you will be disappointed, The anodic coating is brittle so any flexing will cause the coating to crack to a point that it becomes compromised.
          100% agree. Aluminum oxide is too hard to be useful on parts that will bend and/or flex to a large degree.

          I doubt that any 2 pieces anodized at the same time and close to each other would ever "bond". Reason being is that the anodic coating grows from the aluminum substrate and pushes outward, making the outer most oxide layer the oldest. Unlike painting or plating where you would bond to piece if they were close enough, anodizing 2 parts close together would simply push the parts further away (albeit unnoticeably) as the oxide grows I would think.
          Kevin
          Last edited by KevinB; 09-21-2020, 12:11 PM.
          Process control doesn't give you good quality, it gives you consistent quality.
          Good quality comes from consistently doing the right things.

          Process control systems for Anodizers
          If a post helps you out LIKE the post
          I'm not an Amateur Metal Finisher. I've just been around the industry for a dozen years or so helping and consulting when and where I can.

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