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  • Other materials in Anodizing tank?

    I was wondering what if any other material could be placed in the tank while anodizing. Specifically, I was wondering if I could use some sort of silicon adhesive to hold the airline in-place, and if the purple compounds used to join PVC piping would be an issue in the tank?
    Does anyone know a source for digital thermometers which can be used in the anodize tank as well as the other tanks?
    I switched to rectangular poly-propoline tanks (from Lows) and find that the tanks sag somewhat. I have double-tanked to help avoid a spill, but someone suggested that you could easily create a tank using 1/4" PVC-sheet and a plastic welder. Has anyone tried this?

  • #2
    Go to Staples and get a rectangular plastic office waste paper basket. Make a wooden frame to prevent it from tipping over.

    Silicone sealants or PVC adhesive shouldn't bother the chemistry. You need to be concerned with the adhesive tolerating the 5% concentration sulfuric acid electrolyte. Most epoxy/plastic based ones will.

    Digital thermometers are available from Radio Shack (low end) to McMaster-Carr or MSC (high end) the same goes about acid compatibility.

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    • #3
      airline stabilizer!

      Try this...get a piece of rigid water line like the type and size used to connect the water supply to the ice maker of a `fridge. Cut the length so it will fit flat on the bottom of your tank and stay an inch or so away from the sides of the tank. This is the hose you put your holes in, and then use a lighter to seal off one end or you can make a loop using the valve that came in your kit for a more even flow of bubbles. Attach the rubber hose that came with the kit to the rigid hose by slipping the rubber hose over the rigid and then tighten-seal using a zip tie. I've then attached that to a piece of 1" PVC about 6" in length with a couple more zip ties. This rig will sit nicely in the bottom of your tank where it belongs, give pretty good agitation and introduces no foriegn elements to your chemistry. Hope this helps out

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Fibergeek
        Silicone sealants or PVC adhesive shouldn't bother the chemistry. You need to be concerned with the adhesive tolerating the 5% concentration sulfuric acid electrolyte. Most epoxy/plastic based ones will.
        What about a spray-in bedliner product like Rhinoliner? They claim that their product resists acid spills; could I use a metal washtub with a spray-in bedliner sitting on top of a hot plate to use as a heat source, with the plastic agitator tube embedded into the spray liner while wet to provide air bubbles?

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        • #5
          I don't know anything about truck bed liners.
          If you want to be sure, I suggest that you consult the manufacturer about acid compatibility.

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