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Anodizing calculations (720 Rule)

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  • #46
    Re: Anodizing calculations (720 Rule)

    I know this is a bit old, but I would appreciate if someone could re-upload the Excel file. Pretty please?

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    • #47
      Re: Anodizing calculations (720 Rule)

      I am working on an iPhone, Android, Windows Mobile app. Its submitted and should be approved in a couple days here. I will keep everyone posted.

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      • #48
        Re: Anodizing calculations (720 Rule)

        Android version approved.
        https://play.google.com/store/apps/d...ulting.anocalc

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        • #49
          Re: Anodizing calculations (720 Rule)

          iOS version approved "AnoCalc"
          https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/anocalc/id789806232

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          • #50
            Re: Anodizing calculations (720 Rule)

            Hello,

            I am having difficulty understaing what is true or not.
            As I want to anodize ma part without going to mate surface.
            My part is 13 sq inches, and calculator says 0.54 per 13 sq inches.
            Is this correct?
            In the 1st post you said 20 AM per square feet.
            Cant figure out which one is true.
            Also, I was using 0.023 A (1.92 amps per 13 inches) per square centimeter.
            Can you help me out.

            Thanks,

            Marko

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            • #51
              Re: Anodizing calculations (720 Rule)

              Originally posted by lopata View Post
              Hello,

              I am having difficulty understaing what is true or not.
              As I want to anodize ma part without going to mate surface.
              My part is 13 sq inches, and calculator says 0.54 per 13 sq inches.
              Is this correct?
              In the 1st post you said 20 AM per square feet.
              Cant figure out which one is true.
              Also, I was using 0.023 A (1.92 amps per 13 inches) per square centimeter.
              Can you help me out.

              Thanks,

              Marko
              What current density are you going to use? What voltage and amperage can your PS do?
              SS

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              • #52
                Re: Anodizing calculations (720 Rule)

                Hi,

                My PSU can get 25V and 5 amps.
                PSU is not the problem, the problem is the current ratio per square centimeter, or inch. I was doing calculations, and by the calculations stated here, its should go very low amp per square centimeter, or better, decimeter.
                I read that it was 2Amps per sq decimeter, and by the calculations here I should go almost 1 amp per sq decimeter.

                Thanks,

                Marko

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                • #53
                  Re: Anodizing calculations (720 Rule)

                  The PS is one part that dictates the current density that can be run. Yours at optimum ability can run a 72sq. inch part at 10A ASF. I would run at a 8A current density to give the PS room to compensate for connection and temperature. A 13 sq. inch part would have a set amperage of .72A and run for 90 minutes to get a 1 mil coating.
                  SS

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                  • #54
                    Re: Anodizing calculations (720 Rule)

                    I'm thinking about trying my hand at anodizing I've got a tube 6in long 1.7 dia with 1.1 Id I'd like to test with I'm thinking this would be around 1sq surface ft. not sure about that and need to know if I could do it with a 10a car charger or a 3a 30v psu (it may be 5A I'll have to check).

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