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  • Stripping anodizing

    Ok, I know I can strip anodizing using various methods and solutions.. my question is if there is a way to mask the parts you don't wish to be stripped?

    Sorry if this has been ask before, but I couldn't find any topics on it.

    Thanks,
    Kyle

  • #2
    Re: Stripping anodizing

    Caswell sells a product called Mask-it that you can brush on.

    http://www.caswellplating.com/kits/maskit.htm

    SS

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    • #3
      Re: Stripping anodizing

      instead of making a new thread I'll just add to this one..

      What about using sandblasting to remove the anodizing? I know it can be done, but how much power is required? Would the 'pencil blasting' units caswell sells work, or do I need something with more power behind it?

      I'm not particularly concerned about it being slow in removing it, as long as it won't take me hours to get anywhere at all.

      Also, I know I can easily mask the sandblasting area.. but will it leave me clean lines, or will the anodizing chip or flake?

      Thanks for your help,

      Kyle

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      • #4
        Re: Stripping anodizing

        I use glass bead to remove anodize all the time. If you have the air pressure and volume it shouldn't take long to remove. The lines it will leave will depend on the masking job and the direction of the blasting.
        SS

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        • #5
          Re: Stripping anodizing

          any suggestions on airflow/pressure requirements?

          The pencil blaster caswell sells shows 1.5cfm at 80psi.. but that seems low to me.. I'm assuming I could use more pressure with the same setup?

          I'm not doing a ton of work like this, so I hate to spend a ton to get it set up. (I already have a suitable compressor..)

          Assuming it is well mask and I'm careful about blast direction.. will the anodizing remaining be prone to chipping? I would think not, but I've never taken it off, just put it on.

          Kyle

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          • #6
            Re: Stripping anodizing

            I was referring more to the compressor cfm. If your doing smaller parts, a bench type blaster will work fine. Using glass bead 50 to 60 psi works good. If you go with the higher pressure it comes off good but leaves the surface too textured for anodizing without etching and can embed media into the substrate. Anodize doesn't chip or peel like other coatings.
            SS

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            • #7
              Re: Stripping anodizing

              ah, ok.. my compressor is capable of 7cfm, I should be fine.

              thanks for all of your help

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              • #8
                Re: Stripping anodizing

                Any time.
                SS

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