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  • #16
    If you are going to do this in quantity, use Gas Tank Sealer. It can be thinned with lacquer thinner and brushed on. It's a phenol novolac epoxy and will easily withstand the chemicals.

    Search the Caswell web site for gas tank sealer.
    --
    Mike Caswell
    Caswell Inc
    http://www.caswellplating.com
    Need Support? Visit our online support section at http://support.caswellplating.com

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    • #17
      Your resistor bank is correct. You can use it for an entire range of current settings. You could always get 10 ohms for your 1.2 amp requirement by taking 2 of your 10 ohm resistors in parallel and then put that in series with another pair of 10 ohm resistors in parallel. That will give you 10 ohms with 40 watt capability.


      Ken.

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      • #18
        Great I never thought of it that way, I can do more than I thought with what I have. I could probibly go much higher than 1.2 amp if I wire it right.

        I decided to do something simpler while I learn the trade. I currently working with cigars, but the problem is that they float. Any ideas on how to make them stay under the solution.

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        • #19
          Run a piece of #10 copper wire thru the center before doing the epoxy encapsulation. Then it can act as your hanger wire, and if not the weight, its rigidity will keep the cigar in place.

          Ken

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          • #20
            Ok, I tried doing the cigars with sealent and the silvrapray cracks really bad. Also, I found the the sealant causes the cigar to wrikle. Any idea what is causing the silvraspray to crack?

            I went ahead and bought some epoxy resin and have some cigars curing now, they didnt wrikle at all this time. Im going to wait the full 72 hours before I try to apply the silraspray. I only have about 5oz left of the silvraspray and cant afford to waste anymore.

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            • #21
              I never used the Gas Tank Sealant at all, I am sure it has its application. If it can be thinned and yet is an epoxy, then it can be sprayed onto objects and could become a great base for a number of projects. But, again I have never tried it. Perhaps there is an incompatibility between the tank sealer and the Silvaspray. You're forging new ground here, so there will be a few lessons learned along the way to be sure.

              Our local hobby shop is a source of some additional ideas to consider. There is a two part, thin epoxy mix for treating balsa model airplane wings. You can reinforce this with glass "rods" which are glass epoxy shavings sold by the ounce. There is also a very nice two part epoxy molding resin which is thin and workable. I have used this to do bakelite case repairs on clocks and it is a miracle compound. Either could be used to reinforce the rose or cigar for subsequent treatments with Silvaspray. I have used autobody lacquer primer over it with excellent results--no cracking, orange peel, dry down, etc. Very beautiful, stable, and durable material.

              Silver Epoxy is on my list of things to try. It is used for its very high conductivity (as low as .01 ohms per square) in the electronics industry. It has potential promise for pot metal spot repair (to replace soldering and other methods of filling). In large quantities it could be used for what you're doing. However I doubt it is cost effective. It is $50 for a small tube mix, and hundreds of dollars for a two pint mix. So, the Silvaspray is still the leading contender once you get the right epoxy sealant in place.

              Ken

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              • #22
                Currently, I am not using the Gas Tank Sealant. I am using a two part epoxy resin i bought from hobby lobby. I am going to try a direct coat of silvrapray from there. The cracking I was having was from the caswell sealent I tried. I might try the caswell sealent or laquer over the epoxy if the direct silvraspray coat doesnt work. I am on a short budget here, so I need to produce a product for resale before I can spent more money, so I hope I see some headway soon.

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                • #23
                  I tried going strait to acid copper with silvaspray a half dozen times, failed every time. The only process that would work is to plate with nickel first, then acid copper, that worked every time. I was plating over a hard clay and sometimes I would get a little wrinkling. I am guessing (and this is a total guess) that it may have been due to thermal expansion and contraction. The garage was very cold during the days I was plating, and I'm afraid going from a temperature of 45 degrees in air, to 110 degrees in the tank may have affected the thin plating

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                  • #24
                    I concur with your experience with the copper. I'm nearly 100% convinced that these paints don't hold up in solutions at either end of the pH scale. The alkaline copper (flash copper) at a pH of 10 breaks down the Silvaspray paint, and the acid copper (ver low pH--well under 1.0) does the same thing. But the nickel, at a pH of 4, is much gentler on it.

                    Not sure about the wrinkling--whether it is due to expansion and contraction, or some other effect. A controlled experiment could help decode that mystery.

                    Ken

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                    • #25
                      It WORKED! I went for the nickel bath first. Some of the paint came off, but i did a lite coat of silvraspray and did a replate and came out fine.

                      Problem is, its only shiny on high stops.

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                      • #26
                        Once you have a solid coat of nickel you can plate over with copper. Get enough on there to buff it (probably a few hours of plating with a very light sanding between 1 hour coats). then buff lightly. After that do your final nickel right before you gold plate. You'll be in business.

                        Ken

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                        • #27
                          I think I just found out what happens when you dont wash the item with distiled water

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                          • #28
                            Some folks here claim to have had success with tap water. Here in Texas we have so much lime in the water that a film can be seen floating on top if you boil it enough. While distilled is not perfect, it is infinitely better than the tap water here. Since this is geographically dependent, and distilled water is cheap (for small tank setups), it's always better safe than sorry. When I am plating heavily, every 2 weeks I spend $15 for distilled water. Not bad.

                            Ken

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                            • #29
                              My last cigar had white spots on it that smelt like chlorine.

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                              • #30
                                Ok, ran into my first problem with doing the nickel plate first. The nickel is to brittle and cracks off.

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