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  • Buffing compound grease

    Would it be feasible to use "Zylene" (Zylo) to de-grease after buffing part? Does Zxlene leave a trace residue. I used to use it as a degreaser before sand blasting parts and was told that it didn't leave a residue after evaporation?? Thanks,Fred
    "Viva Zapata"

  • #2
    Any volatile solvent is going to leave a residue unless you filter it continuously or use multiple rinses. The reason is because the solvent keeps the contaminants in suspension, effectively re-contaminating the part. With enough rinses you can dilute the contaminants down to a level that doesn't affect you, but this is inefficient.

    I wouldn't recommend using solvent cleaners as a standard part of your plating process. The disposal problems are difficult and they don't work as well as other methods.

    Using cavitation (ultrasonics) for cleaning is the very best way to go. You need a good cleaning medium to go with it. A number of water-based detergent cleaners available that are designed to work with an ultrasonic can work. SP Degreaser used with ultrasonics? Never tried it, but it should work.

    I realize that this isn't the answer for everyone. If you're cleaning automotive wheels, the ultrasonic approach is going to be unaffordable to most.

    Ken

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    • #3
      Zylene

      Originally posted by dadkar2
      Any volatile solvent is going to leave a residue unless you filter it continuously or use multiple rinses. The reason is because the solvent keeps the contaminants in suspension, effectively re-contaminating the part. With enough rinses you can dilute the contaminants down to a level that doesn't affect you, but this is inefficient.

      I wouldn't recommend using solvent cleaners as a standard part of your plating process. The disposal problems are difficult and they don't work as well as other methods.

      Using cavitation (ultrasonics) for cleaning is the very best way to go. You need a good cleaning medium to go with it. A number of water-based detergent cleaners available that are designed to work with an ultrasonic can work. SP Degreaser used with ultrasonics? Never tried it, but it should work.

      I realize that this isn't the answer for everyone. If you're cleaning automotive wheels, the ultrasonic approach is going to be unaffordable to most.

      Ken
      Well Ken,Looks like my chemical cleaners are out for sure. Of my two previous plating experiences,the first used gasoline as a precleaner before pickling in Muriatic acid. The second used a hot trichloroethylene (Trike) degreaser rinse then into either a Cad or Anodizing tank. I'll check on an ultrasonic cleaning tank along with the SP Degreaser solution. Thanks for your info. My part is a 2 1/8" Dia. X-mas tree ornament so it shouldn't be too much of a problem. Have a good day,Fred
      "Viva Zapata"

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      • #4
        Gasoline...oh goodness. I don't think the muriatic pickle was providing any cleaning value of significance. I have heard that the cyanide formulations often provided some slight cleaning effect. But we're not going to be using that here.

        I have had my best luck with a two stage cleaning process--a strong ultrasonic-complatible detergent to cut the buffing grease (with an ultrasonic clean of course) followed by a secondary clean using a professional plating soak or electroclean (with NaOH in the mix).

        Ken

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        • #5
          Solvents will break down oils easily, so fingerprints, WD40, engine oil etc. can easily be used to remove these items. Do not use the solvent over, because as previously discussed, it holds the oil from the previous clean.

          Having said that, a good detergent will attach molecules to the oil, transforming it to a soap, which will wash off with water, and it is often my prefered choice. Mix the detergent with some mild abrasive and you have something that will break down the oils, and gently abrade away any thin oxides present. = SOFTSCRUB!!!!

          Greases are, for want of a better description, 'frozen oil', and solvents don't work well on these materials.
          Best way to remove greases is to break it down with a chemical that turns it into a soap, lye or sodium hydroxide materials will do this. Then it will flush away with hot water.

          Acids are a complete waste of time, as the oil will protect the metal from the acid.
          --
          Mike Caswell
          Caswell Inc
          http://www.caswellplating.com
          Need Support? Visit our online support section at http://support.caswellplating.com

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