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copy chrome vs triple chrome plating

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  • dmelvill
    replied
    Re: copy chrome vs triple chrome plating

    Hi Jim, thanks for the info on Copy Chrome vs Triple Plate. Myself I have both and agree with your comments; my worry has always been the durability of Copy Chrome in the long run for automotive applications. I noticed in your pic gallery you plated a set of Goldwing exghaust tips. Can you let me know how that has held up so far with use?
    Lastly Jim I have a couple questions about setting up a small plating enterprise. I have plated several pieces for a local antique car club for free to get my work noticed. Now that has been accomplished I find myself in a delemma as I have no idea what would be a a good method to base pricing on? I sure don't want to sell myself short or over-under charge customers. This may not be the thread to ansawer this question, but you can e-mail me at [email protected] if you like. Any suggestions to steer me in the right direction would be appreciated.
    Thanks:
    Dave

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  • ClassicBoatworks
    replied
    Re: copy chrome vs triple chrome plating

    I posted the following on the "Reprochrome" forum with no replay. I add here the difference between copy and repro?

    Hello all,
    Can a user tell me about the quality of REPROCHROME? I work with Classic Boats and am thinking about purchasing a REPROCHROME kit. My concern is that the quality (looks) is truly comparable with chrome. I am in California so doing chrome is out of the question. The REPROCHROME sure looks good in the pictures but what about when I hold it in my hand?

    I purchased powder coaticon "chrome" that looked good in the photos too but isn't even close to real chrome. I get a "gray" color.

    Your opinions are requested. I hate to spend $1000+ and find it is a bust.

    I can use the REPROCHROME different ways. Over classic bronze pieces, over cheaper pot-metal pieces. Perhaps some exceptional pieces still need to go to the chrome plate shop?

    The Caswell rep says it is pretty hard to tell from chrome.

    Thank you,
    Dean

    Leave a comment:


  • jimcarry
    replied
    Re: copy chrome vs triple chrome plating

    My kit is 25 gal. as far as the look I don?t see a difference in the cobalt steel and the nickel I have to say that if the part is prepped properly you can achieve the same look as triple chrome I my self plate for a lot of car clubs in this area and when I go to the shows I see my work everywhere.
    I would have to say that if you asked Caswells for the cobalt steel anode the would send it with any buy although it is a little more expensive

    Leave a comment:


  • mikedinmd
    replied
    Re: copy chrome vs triple chrome plating

    jimcarry, a question. caswell still shows a nickel anode for the kits listed. how large a kit are you talking about? would the end result be different from using the different anodes? ( other than being harder as you mentioned) wouldn't it be better if all kits were improved? ok, that's more than "a" question, but anyone can jump in. mike

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  • jimcarry
    replied
    Re: copy chrome vs triple chrome plating

    Here is my two cents
    when I first started with copy chrome I used the one step process with a 3gal kit it worked very well with very few problems after playing with this kit for some time I discovered that it work best at 1 Amp per 32 sq inches I have sense moved to a larger kit and am now using copper also
    flash copper gives a better surface for the copy chrome to hold onto I am now thinking of also getting acid copper and nickle baths to use a triple plate process but with copy chrome as a final as a final plate. Although it is true that in the smaller kits a nickle anode is used in the larger kit a cobalt steel anode is used and gives a much harder surface then nickle. Also due to EPA concerns
    the copy chrome is much safer and accepted by the EPA standards in fact they have told me it was the best chrome substitute they had seen trying to come into this area and after looking at my MSDS they approved of what I was doing

    Leave a comment:


  • jimcarry
    replied
    Re: copy chrome vs triple chrome plating

    Originally posted by splbnd27
    That is what I am trying to find out, ARE there differances with the copy chrome and what they are, good or bad.

    My long range goal is to try and build a plating busisness, because there is nothing like that anywhere around my area, and I think it could be a thriving busisness. I realize that every busisness has it's pitfalls, but if some of these problems could be avoided by using the copy chrome it would sure make it easier to get something going. But if I am comparing apples to oranges then thats a whole different story.

    Let me ask it another way, if I copper plated then nickel plated two identical items , then chromed one and copy chromed the other and they both came out perfect , how much of a differance would there be between them, color shine , durability etc.

    Bob
    I have posted a picture of Chrome verses Copy Chrome in the Photo Gallery
    http://forum.caswellplating.com/phot...0&ppuser=17870 i have used Copy Chrome for a little over a year and it is awsome

    Leave a comment:


  • Tim1hd
    replied
    If the CopyChrome is Cobalt now can you still apply real chrome plate to it? Also how do you know if you have the new CopyChrome?

    Thanks Tim

    Leave a comment:


  • splbnd27
    replied
    If the copy chrome doesn"t have any nickel in it would it be at all benifical to
    nickel plate then copy chrome over the nickel?
    I was planning on using flash copper first, then copper as a surfacer, then the copy chrome.

    Bob

    Leave a comment:


  • dadkar2
    replied
    Thanks for the update. Pretty cool.

    Ken

    Leave a comment:


  • mcaswell
    replied
    We upgraded the Copy Chrome system some time ago. There is no nickel in the system now, it is a cobalt system. Much harder than nickel.

    Leave a comment:


  • dadkar2
    replied
    Hi Bob,

    Most of the properties of chrome plating come from the nickel.

    Copy chrome is nickel.

    The difference between nickel and copy chrome is that cobalt is added, which gives the finish a slightly blue tint, much like chrome plating does. Nickel, without the chrome plating or cobalt, will have a very slightly yellowish tint. You can see it if you hold a chrome finished part next to a nickel finished part.

    The chrome finish adds to the hardness and durability of the item. I'm not aware of any side by side studies between chrome and copy chrome )aka nickel plating) for durability in the environment, but that's why chrome plating was done from the very beginning. Given how difficult it is to deal with, it must have been worth it.

    If you're not subjecting your parts to extreme environmental conditions, salt, etc., then just stick with the copy chrome. You'll sleep better not having to worry about the hazards of chromic acid, the fumes, and the EPA concerns. If you MUST do chrome, then for goodness sakes just be very careful. Outfit the plating area with a fume hood. Follow all of Caswell's instructions and use the fume suppressant he sells.

    Ken

    Leave a comment:


  • splbnd27
    replied
    Hi Ken,
    Everybody tells me that the copy chrome is identical to triple chrome, including the people at caswell. The shine, durabilty etc . are the same. So if this is the case it seems to me that it would much better suit me to use it.
    There are no enviromental issues, you use less amps while plating, the solution is virtually permanant, no fumes.
    I think the pros outway the cons, as a matter of fact I don't even see a plus for the triple chrome, but thats just my opinion.
    Thanks everybody for your input, I am looking foward to hearing more.

    thanks
    bob

    Leave a comment:


  • dadkar2
    replied
    Copy chrome is basically a substitute for the nickel in the triple chrome process, with no chrome third step.

    So, the only difference between the two is with copy chrome it's no longer a triple step process. It's a 2 step process. Frankly, since there is no real prep work involved between the nickel and the chrome step, it's really just time in the chrome tank and having enough rectifier current to get the job done right.

    Don't overlook that third point. It can be a real engineering challenge with large parts.

    Also, I applaud you for considering the environmental concerns. Hexavalent chromium is a known carcinogen. The chromic acid fumes are not good for your health. However, on a very small scale (eg perhaps a few gallons at most) these things can be controlled with great care. But don't think it's easy. For example, if an accidental spill were to occur, would you be tempted to just mop it up and rinse the mop out in the sink? Or would you contain the wastewater and properly dispose of it? You have to be very disciplined about it. Most people aren't. That's why the EPA is so strict.

    Ken

    Leave a comment:


  • chrisk
    replied
    i wouldnt really like to go pro using copychrome. Not that i don't think it's good, just joe public want real chrome plating-end of discussion. Not that they will ever tell the difference. They don't really understand plating, they just heard/read about chrome plating and thats what there after. I bet you even if they wanna save money they'd rather put chrome straight to metal rather than triple plate and watch it rust before their very eyes than go with copy-chrome.

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  • clydes
    replied
    if you do copy chrome you can do larger items. chrome has its limits even with a 250 amp rectifier. i started a shop and am finding out that its all about the power. spend the money get a bigger rectifier and then the copy chrome issue goes away. i think and its only my opinoin that the public would be less likely to pay top dollar for copy chrome. some have can to us just for that reason that they want the real thing. go big out of the gate on the power supply and you will have better luck all around. just my thoughts on the issue. clydes

    Leave a comment:

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