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  • adambond
    replied
    mdarr
    you have a very easy to use power supply.
    turn your volts all the way up then adjust your amps accordingly.
    dont let the volts get too far over 12. if so you will then have to tweak of both knobs to maintain desired amps.
    bondo

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  • mdarr
    replied
    Originally posted by 48Buick

    Stay away from HOBBYPLATING.Com....
    I can say this because I have watched several people loose 1000s to them. They are Baaaaad..... (I dont get into throwing stones...but also dont want to see people ripped off!)
    P.S. and im not even an affilitate!!!
    48Buick
    :P
    I didn't want to mention any names but I never received any replies from them on any questions I had and their phone was always busy. Plus I discovered a few other things about their kits that made theirs more expensive...Thanks again guys

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  • 48Buick
    replied

    I dont want to throw any wrenches in any gears here...but, different power supplies work in thier own way..
    I have 6, ranging from 10 amp to 500 amp. Each one is different.
    Basically you want to be able to adjust the amperage setting. This will happen either by turning the amp all the way up and adjusting the volts or turning the volts all the way up and adjusting the amps.
    Short out your terminals on the back of the PS with a heavy wire and see how it works.
    Once you know which knob to adjust, figure out your square inches on the part, put it in the bath, adjust either knob to get the desired amperage and plate away!
    As for other hobby plating sites......Stick with Caswell if you want to buy kits and stuff.
    Stay away from HOBBYPLATING.Com....
    I can say this because I have watched several people loose 1000s to them. They are Baaaaad..... (I dont get into throwing stones...but also dont want to see people ripped off!)
    P.S. and im not even an affilitate!!!
    48Buick
    :P

    Leave a comment:


  • mdarr
    replied
    Thanks for the info! I ordered the 4 gallon triple chrome plating kit yesterday. Can't wait to get into some plating. I was back and forth between this site and vendor and another and I must say that this site gives the best support, both from the vendor and other plating patrons. Thanks again!

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  • dadkar2
    replied
    Hello,

    I recommend you use the constant current method. First you calculate or estimate the area of the item to be plated. Then, you multiply this by the amps/sq in provided for the plating kit in Caswell’s manual. This is the current that you set on the power supply.

    I have found that this works better for several reasons. First, the resistance of these solutions is quite low with small tanks, and varies depending on the size of the object. Second, the connections to the object and anodes have resistance, which is often similar to the solution resistance. These factors make it very difficult to set up the proper current using constant voltage mode. Using constant current mode, these resistances can vary and you’ll still deliver the right current to the solution.

    Congratulations on choosing a regulated power supply. This approach is infinitely more versatile, easier to use, and repeatable than the series light bulb approach.

    Ken

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  • mdarr
    started a topic Power Supply Settings

    Power Supply Settings

    I have a 10 volt 100 amp Hewlett Packard power supply. It can be set up for either constant current or constant voltage. Which do I want? Do I crank the voltage all the way up and then adjust the current to the desired level or do I crank the current all the way up and then adjust the voltage until the current is at the desired level? Thanks!
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