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Pricing handguns with copy chrome

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  • Pricing handguns with copy chrome

    I am new to the forum. Do you have any ideas on how to price hand guns or similiar sized pieces? Thanks! ) Norman Z
    How do you know what the market will bear? Any personal examples? Your input will be greatly appreciated.
    Last edited by augsburg; 02-23-2009, 01:45 PM.

  • #2
    Re: Pricing handguns with copy chrome

    Originally posted by augsburg View Post
    I am new to the forum. Do you have any ideas on how to price hand guns or similiar sized pieces? Thanks! ) Norman Z
    How do you know what the market will bear? Any personal examples? Your input will be greatly appreciated.
    First off, if you are doing this to earn money refinishing firearms or even just doing it for "friends" I STRONGLY advise you to make an appointment with a BATF agent so the 2 of you can sit down and discuss the law regarding your activities. You may very well need a Federal Firearms License of some sort and they can explain the different licenses and the record-keeping requirements to you. You can look the laws up online but I still advise you to sit down with an agent and make sure you understand what will be required of you. The license fees are affordable (and are MUCH cheaper than attorney fees).

    Guns without the original finish are not worth anywhere near what an original specimen would be. This will make a big difference in what you get from a gun collector. It probably won't matter to someone who is not a collector, and they may even be willing to pay a little bit more for a quality refinishing job.

    Just be honest and clearly identify the piece as being refinished and what process you used. That way you won't have unhappy customers. Reputation means a lot in the gun industry. Your reputation (good or bad) will precede you.

    Remember, talk to the BATF folks BEFORE you start doing this.

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    • #3
      Re: Pricing handguns with copy chrome

      Thank you for the good advice, I accept it. Regards, Norman Z

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      • #4
        Re: Pricing handguns with copy chrome

        Originally posted by augsburg View Post
        Thank you for the good advice, I accept it. Regards, Norman Z
        Norman, Any gun that has been "refinished" has lost approx. 30% to 40% of its value. Even when refinished with original finish. MOST people will not pay the regular price listed in the "Blue book of gun values" Not due to the finish mostly because of the process and the ability to replicate the Original. Sorry if this hurts a bit, BUT if you expect to keep the weapon then you can customize it any way you like, just remember that in selling that weapon to someone else they have no clue what process was used. Besides that if it is a cheap weapon (like a "Starr" or "Noricin") dressing it up will not make any diff. If it is a like a Beretta or a colt SAA DO NOT do anything, your value will go way down.

        As far as the BTAF goes, it is a private weapon and as long as the serial number is intact it is a legal weapon (No alterations of the number at all). IF you intend to sell it (at least in Fla., check your state for selling of private collections) you sell it as a "private collection piece" Just Keep REALLY GOOD records of transaction and make sure you have a signed receipt say that the buyer indicated he/she had no problems owning a firearm, keep this as if it was the deed to a GOLD mine. If you intend to make a living doing this YOU MUST HAVE a valid FFL.

        Good luck, Mike.

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        • #5
          Re: Pricing handguns with copy chrome

          First and most important plating or refinishing firearms is gunsmithing and requires a FFL license|After that comes the state and local licenses, It took me over a year and a lot of money to get mine. Having said that I charge $200 in matte and $250 in bright for handguns in chrome or nickel and $350 in black chrome and $500 in 24k gold. thnc charlie@overlandplating.com
          overlandindustries

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          • #6
            Re: Pricing handguns with copy chrome

            He's already been told he needs an FFL in an earlier post. It must be a California thing, my FFL took right around 60 days.

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            • #7
              Re: Pricing handguns with copy chrome

              Originally posted by Brintiff View Post
              He's already been told he needs an FFL in an earlier post. It must be a California thing, my FFL took right around 60 days.
              Actually he said "May (very well) need.
              But, yes, you do need an FFL unless you're going to do the work while the customer waits. If he stays on site for 2-3 days while you do it, you won't need it. (not a lot of your customers are going to wait like that...I can promise you that)

              BUT!!!!....If he leaves the premisis, you do need a license.
              Manufacturers - FAQ's
              ATF Online - Firearms FAQs


              ATF Online


              Yes, talk to a BATFE agent BEFORE you accept your first firearm. They ARE usually easy to talk to and USUALLY have the correct information for you. If you have the slightest doubt or concern with what he might be telling you is false or misleading, call up the BATFE and ask.

              If you're dealing with firearms, better have a lawyer on retainer that knows firearm laws...take it from someone who grew up in a FFL household.

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              • #8
                Re: Pricing handguns with copy chrome

                "The Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994, referred to as the “Crime Bill,” enacted requirements that applicants engaging in firearms businesses notify the chief of their local law enforcement agency of their intent to apply for a license, submit their responsible persons’ photographs and fingerprints with their applications, and certify that their businesses would be in compliance with state and local laws, including zoning regulations.

                Additionally, in 2004, ATF implemented an in-person application inspection program. ATF industry operations investigators now conduct in-person application
                inspections with all new firearms business applicants. Through the inspection process, investigators verify the identity of the applicant, ensure the qualification of the person(s) intending to conduct business, verify the business premises, and review the recordkeeping and conduct of business requirements to assist the applicant in complying with the law and regulations. In addition to educating the applicant about regulatory responsibilities, these efforts encourage voluntary business practices that can prevent diversion of firearms from lawful commerce to the illegal market."
                Last edited by CarWiz; 08-11-2009, 11:49 PM.

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