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  • Polishing Block and Transmission

    I apologize if this has been ask, I have browsed around trying to find the info to avoid doing the typical newbie stuff...LOL

    I am in the beginning of our rebuilding project and I have done a little (very little..lol) polishing of aluminum in the past. My question is, if I polish the aluminum engine block and transmission while I have it out of the car, will it discolor or turn purple in time?

    The car will not be a daily driver, other than driving it to shows until we get a trailer.

    Thanks for any help and insight and again, I apologize if this has been ask a million times and I was not able to find it.

    Dean

  • #2
    Polished parts don't purple, i believe stainless and chrome does, but dont quote me on that. If you do decide to polish these parts, make sure you pickup a sealer, like zoops seal. It's exspensive, but from what i hear, its well worth it. Checkit out at zoopseal.com. If you do this post pics, it would be an awesome sight to see. Good luck!

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    • #3
      I reccomend Zoopseal to all of my customers for polished steel and aluminum parts.

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks for all the great information. I am starting to think I have gotten into a bigger job than I anticipated...lol But it'll all be worth it in the end. Thats what concerned me the most is sealing it once I've spent who knows how many hours to come polishing it all.

        Then I received my new engine block this week and they sprayed with some type of clear coat sealer stuff.....only adding to the fun...lol

        I'll have to check out the zoopseal as I don't have any specialty type tools like an infared dryer etc. This all being done in the home garage.

        Thanks again for taking the time to share your information!

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        • #5
          Well, I have gotten a pretty good start on the transmission. I've been using 2" course and fine polishing disc with the air die grinder. Can't wait to start polishing this thing! Do any of you have any tips on getting into the smaller area's such as around the bolts? I've searched everywhere for some smaller type abrasive tools to no avail. I've tried the little drum sander for the dremal, but it seems to leave some nasty scratches. Any help would be greatly appreciated!

          I may end up having to spend the $$$ on the zoopseal as I would hate to see this tarnish when its finished. Any input on the VHT Clear sold here on Caswell? Or would that not be something I would want to use to seal this up? Sorry for all the questions and the poor quality picture.

          Thanks again,
          Dean

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          • #6
            You can get into those tight corners around the bolts with a felt bullet bob. Maybe even a mushroom bob in certain areas. Although if you're gonna use those, make sure you get some greaseless compounds to use with them, because black emery compound isn't strong enough to knock down the rough cast. Caswell sells all of that stuff.

            Also, you gotta keep in mind that Zoop Seal is only guaranteed to last for 2 years. So unless you plan on yanking that tranny out within the next 2 years to repolish it, you might wanna go with a coating that's more permanent. Haven't used VHT myself but I hear it's pretty good. Hope that helps.
            "Some people are like sandpaper: they may delight in the misery they inflict by rubbing up against you, but in the end you will come out smooth and polished while they'll just be ugly, wrinkled, and used up." - Beyonce Knowles

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            • #7
              Originally posted by thesound
              You can get into those tight corners around the bolts with a felt bullet bob. Maybe even a mushroom bob in certain areas. Although if you're gonna use those, make sure you get some greaseless compounds to use with them, because black emery compound isn't strong enough to knock down the rough cast. Caswell sells all of that stuff.

              Also, you gotta keep in mind that Zoop Seal is only guaranteed to last for 2 years. So unless you plan on yanking that tranny out within the next 2 years to repolish it, you might wanna go with a coating that's more permanent. Haven't used VHT myself but I hear it's pretty good. Glisten PC from POR-15 is supposed to be pretty good too. Hope that helps.
              Thanks for the reply. I ordered the polishing kit, but I'll have to order some greaseless compounds. (thanks for that info!) Yeah, I was reading more about the Glisten PC from POR-15 and I am looking at going with that.

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              • #8
                No problem. By the way, I forgot to ask, what kind of engine and transmission are you polishing? I've never seen a tranny like the one in the pic you posted. Keep at it, you're off to a good start. With as many corners and tight radii that the thing has, if you got it blingin' really good it oughtta look like something sent from the gods. (Ahhhh, gotta love that rough cast...)
                "Some people are like sandpaper: they may delight in the misery they inflict by rubbing up against you, but in the end you will come out smooth and polished while they'll just be ugly, wrinkled, and used up." - Beyonce Knowles

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                • #9
                  Its an L3 tranny out of a Honda CRX. Doing the tranny and block (I think) LOL. Getting ready to wet sand the tranny this afternoon. Hopefully the felt bobs and 80 grit greaseless compound I ordered will get into what is left of the nooks and crannies. I've tried the dremel again last night, but I think it causes more damage than good. Thanks again for the help and info!

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                  • #10
                    ZOOPSEAL

                    We now carry this ZOOPSEAL in stock!

                    Watch the webpage for details

                    http://www.caswellplating.com/buffs/zoopseal.html
                    --
                    Mike Caswell
                    Caswell Inc
                    http://www.caswellplating.com
                    Need Support? Visit our online support section at http://support.caswellplating.com

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                    • #11
                      Re: ZOOPSEAL

                      Originally posted by caswell
                      We now carry this product in stock!

                      Watch the webpage for details
                      I wish that answered the question of which product would be preferred to seal something like an engine block, transmission, car frame etc., etc., etc.

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                      • #12
                        Make sure you calculate the heat factor into your sealer purchase. You wouldn't want to seal your part with a lacquer type of product and than see it bubble up.

                        Does anybody know the heat tolerance for Zoopseal?

                        etyrrany

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                        • #13
                          ravetek! I wish I was capable to contribute or comment to your last post. I thought I'd done some research, wow, you definitely have! I too am to the point I know what you mean about the head spinnning...LOL I've about come to the conclusion as well, that there just isn't such a product out there that would satisfy what we want to accomplish. And I hate that because when I am completed with this part of the rebuild project I will undoubtly have close to at least 150 hours of work into it. However, I'm about to the point where as much I hate to, I am just probably going to go with the least expensive route and get the vht clear. I see no point going the expensive route, especially if the result will only be minimal at best in comparison. I hate going the least expensive way, because you normally get what you pay for.

                          Well after 30 to 40 hours (probably more) I have done the final polish on the transmission. I am some what satisfied and wish I could have had a little more patience to make it perfect. There are just so many small nooks and crannies I'm not sure I'd have ever got it perfect but she's blinging'! Thanks for the tips on greaseless compound and the felt bob, that definitely was a great help! I probably should have gotten an assortment of felt bob's. I'll probably have no choice when I get into the intake manifold next.

                          Here are a couple pictures.


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                          • #14
                            NCRXSI: For a first time out of the gate attempt at polishing, you did a great job. As far as your comment about not getting it perfect: my advice is to just take a break. It's kinda weird how quickly that desire for perfection will creep back in when we're not head-butting our way through a project, which I'm pretty sure is how you felt being your first time at polishing. The point is, don't stop until you've satisfied in your own mind that this is as good as it's gonna get. That'll alleviate any regrets 6 months down the road after you've got the car put back together and have it out in the public eye, and everytime somebody new sees it you can't help but think to yourself, "I know what I've got is good, but it isn't my BEST."

                            Now to address Ravetek's post. You're absolutely right: there is NO product on the market that will seal in polished aluminum perfection indefinitely. Why? Because there's too much money to be made. The sad truth is that unless somebody who's a die-hard metal polisher decides to pursue making a product like this, (and if he can get the financial backing for it), or somebody in the know is able to convince a board of directors at some company that this is a product that the public wants, we'll never see it. It makes no sense from an economical standpoint for a company to develop a product that they may have a chance to sell only once vs. a product that they'll be able to sell on a repeat basis because it wears out and the customer demands more.

                            I think the best thing to do is look at all of the products and processes available, weigh the pros and cons, and decide which cons are the easiest for you to live with. I know that sounds overly simplistic, but that's the reality of the situation. In the meantime while you're trying to decide what to do, your polishing job continues to deteriorate...

                            P.S.- If I were NCRXSI, I'd put my money toward some Zoop Seal. Of the products and processes available out there, it's on the cheaper end. Plus, the ad for it has pics of finished products, which look pretty good, and it says that one kit will do 4 wheels and an engine compartment. (Which indicates to me that this stuff must weather well, and stand up against heat.) Even if none of that stuff turns out to be true, you're still only out a measly $130. Something to think about.
                            "Some people are like sandpaper: they may delight in the misery they inflict by rubbing up against you, but in the end you will come out smooth and polished while they'll just be ugly, wrinkled, and used up." - Beyonce Knowles

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                            • #15
                              I have polished engines and tranny's. You can check out a Caddy NorthStar and 700R4 on my website. www.polishingplus.com Zoopseal is a good product but a lot of my customers can't really afford it. You are mainly trying to seal out oxygen and acid fingerprints. A good coating is a good quality marine wax. It stands up well to reasonable heat, gas and oil, even UV rays (so your aluminum won't get a tan Just trying to help. Elrod.

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