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Pits in stainless

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  • Pits in stainless

    I'm polishing stainless trim for the first time and am seeing very small pits after my final polish. They're not visible after final sanding with 1500 grit or after using a sisal wheel with emery, only after polishing with a spiral and stainless compound (green). Is it possible that I'm doing something wrong with the sisal wheel (too much pressure or too slow) that's affecting the metal? I would have expected to have seen the pits after sanding with 1500...Thanks

  • #2
    Re: Pits in stainless

    There is certainly no need to use a sisal wheel with emery after sanding to 1500. That is going backwards. If you have really sanded out all of the scratches left by the previous coarser grits, then the stainless compound on a sewn cotton buff is the next, and maybe the final, step. Sisal wheels are for rough cutting.

    One thing about stainless. It takes a lot more sanding than aluminum or steel. A whole lot more. Most people underestimate how much it takes. It's difficult to sand it effectively by hand—the stuff is just too hard—unless it's a very small piece, which your trim probably is.

    Richard

    Richard

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    • #3
      Re: Pits in stainless

      I read a while back that someone used a piece of wood to support the back of the trim so they could really put some pressure on the trim without bending it. I tried a small spot on a stainless steel sink and after a little while I had a smooth smudge. After that experience if I had to polish stainless steel, it would be something for myself and it would have to be worth it.

      Laters,
      Ken
      Once over dust, Twice over rust. ~USN

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