Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

pure ally

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • pure ally

    looking for tips on how to get a good polish on 1050 grade sheet ali.
    these are small plates , the biggest 10 x 8 inches, down to 4" x 1"
    as its an almost pure grade, its very soft and ive found that a mirror shine is eluding me.
    ive been hand sanding upto 2000 grit wet and dry, making sure that all scratches are gone, and blue compound on a stitched cotton wheel. i rake the wheel every few minutes, but the finish is always hazy.and the wheel leaves marks.
    is there something else i could try ?
    "A stupid man's report of what a clever man says is never accurate because he unconsciously translates what he hears into something he can understand.
    Custom Anodising

  • #2
    Re: pure ally

    Try auto rubbing compound, the clear coat safe stuff...

    Originally posted by spankey666 View Post
    looking for tips on how to get a good polish on 1050 grade sheet ali.
    these are small plates , the biggest 10 x 8 inches, down to 4" x 1"
    as its an almost pure grade, its very soft and ive found that a mirror shine is eluding me.
    ive been hand sanding upto 2000 grit wet and dry, making sure that all scratches are gone, and blue compound on a stitched cotton wheel. i rake the wheel every few minutes, but the finish is always hazy.and the wheel leaves marks.
    is there something else i could try ?
    James Bateman

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: pure ally

      The aluminum I use in my sculpture work is almost all 1100 - 0, which is practically pure aluminum and is dead soft. The sanding steps depend on the size of the surface. I sand larger surfaces to 600 grit and then use emery on a hard sewn buff, followed by a white chrome on a softer buff. Tiny or narrow surfaces I sand to 1500 or 2000 and use the white only. The white brings my aluminum to as good a finish as I could want. A little liquid polish that contains a wax and a very fine abrasive and I'm done.

      I have not had any luck with blue on aluminum. It seems to make the finish worse rather than better. I use it only for acrylic plastic.

      Richard

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: pure ally

        Originally posted by Rasper View Post
        The aluminum I use in my sculpture work is almost all 1100 - 0, which is practically pure aluminum and is dead soft. The sanding steps depend on the size of the surface. I sand larger surfaces to 600 grit and then use emery on a hard sewn buff, followed by a white chrome on a softer buff. Tiny or narrow surfaces I sand to 1500 or 2000 and use the white only. The white brings my aluminum to as good a finish as I could want. A little liquid polish that contains a wax and a very fine abrasive and I'm done.

        I have not had any luck with blue on aluminum. It seems to make the finish worse rather than better. I use it only for acrylic plastic.

        Richard
        thanks guys,
        jimmy, car polish generally has silicone in it and a PITA when it comes to anodising,

        Rasper, ive tried white also, i just end up with a black smeary mess with it, will try it again and see though
        "A stupid man's report of what a clever man says is never accurate because he unconsciously translates what he hears into something he can understand.
        Custom Anodising

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: pure ally

          Don't load your buff up with compound; use it sparingly. When you move the surface of the metal against the spin of the wheel it should leave only a thin film of compound on the part. Then when you come back the other way, it should pick up that film and leave the work perfectly clean and bright. If you have compound all over it you are using way too much.

          Richard

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: pure ally

            white compound (at least the white compounds that i have tried) are what we call a dry compound they are not the greasy type so they should not leave any mess on the part if used properly . too much compound , buff spinning too fast,
            contaminated buff or work surface , damp or wet buffing wheel or part , and also work piece too cold are all possible causes for that situation.
            using a softer buffing wheel like a loose cotton or flannel could help with the fine haze you have.
            also not all polishes contain silicone .
            i had some good results eliminating haze and fine scrathes by using what they call in the auto industry a swirl remover.
            use in small quantity on the part with a very fine cotton or flanel buff .
            http://www.peintureenpoudrepb.com
            http://www.polissagepb.com
            http://www.powdercoatpb.com
            baz

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: pure ally

              Okay Baz, swirl remover. That's something I will remember for possible future problems. I use it on paint but I never thought about using it on metal.

              Richard

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: pure ally

                Originally posted by Rasper View Post
                Okay Baz, swirl remover. That's something I will remember for possible future problems. I use it on paint but I never thought about using it on metal.

                Richard
                yes it does help for me on some aluminium , just make sure you use a clean soft buffing wheel .
                the oposite is also true ! i use green stainless compound to buff out powder coating. sand down the powdercoat with 800 then 1200 then a spiral sewn buff or airflex buff about 1800 rpm with green stainless compound followed by swirl remover on a soft buffing wheel , takes some practice but it works for me .
                http://www.peintureenpoudrepb.com
                http://www.polissagepb.com
                http://www.powdercoatpb.com
                baz

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: pure ally

                  Originally posted by baz View Post
                  yes it does help for me on some aluminium , just make sure you use a clean soft buffing wheel .
                  the oposite is also true ! i use green stainless compound to buff out powder coating. sand down the powdercoat with 800 then 1200 then a spiral sewn buff or airflex buff about 1800 rpm with green stainless compound followed by swirl remover on a soft buffing wheel , takes some practice but it works for me .
                  Nice call on the powder Baz. If I get a texture on my pc I would wet sand then powder clear. I think you just saved me a step and powder. I'll try your way the next time I mess up or want a mirror finish.

                  Laters,
                  Ken
                  Once over dust, Twice over rust. ~USN

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X