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  • New guy problems

    I am new to metal polishing. I'm restoring a 63 Ranchero and would like to polish the trim myself. I have had pretty good luck with the aluminum, but the stainless is kicking my but. I have done well straightening and popping the dents but after that it goes downhill. I am using quality sandpaper, a harbor freight 6 inch polisher, and now a 1 horse polisher with 10 inch spiral sewn wheels. All my wheels and compound are from Caswell, except the 10 inch.
    1st I spend forever sanding and keep finding small scratches that I missed. About 4 hours on a 6 inch piece. Any advice?
    2nd I can't seem to remove any metal with the buff wheels. I sand to 1200 grit , but unless I use a sisal wheel and black emery I can't remove the scratches. After the sisal I use a spiral sewn and can't remove the sisal scratches. I end up with a dull shine. I have gone back and resanded to be certain that I have all the sand scratches out. I also tried sanding with 1200 on a finished piece, and cant remove the scratches with emery and a spiral sewn wheel. Any suggestions would be appreciated. I have also tried a grey for stainless and green, always using separate spiral sewn wheels.
    Thanks, Ron

  • #2
    hopefully this will shed some light for you
    Attached Files
    --
    Jason Vanderbroek
    315 946 1213 x116
    www.caswellplating.com

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    • #3
      Thanks Jason, I had already read that, but I did a reread. I've done a lot of reading and watching videos,but I'm just not getting it. I can't get to the bottom of sand scratches, I just shine them up. One problem I found I think after all the warnings of using to much compound I over compensated and was using to little. Using a little more emery I don't get as many scratches from the sisal wheel, and am doing better at getting them out with the spiral sewn. I still am not getting the results that I want but making some progress.

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      • #4
        could you email me some photos ? that may help me help you. jason@caswellplating.com

        are you using one wheel per bar ?
        --
        Jason Vanderbroek
        315 946 1213 x116
        www.caswellplating.com

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        • #5
          Yes I am using 1 wheel per bar. Pictures have been sent. Thanks

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Sportscape View Post
            I am new to metal polishing.
            1st I spend forever sanding and keep finding small scratches that I missed. About 4 hours on a 6 inch piece. Any advice?
            2nd I can't seem to remove any metal with the buff wheels. I sand to 1200 grit , but unless I use a sisal wheel and black emery I can't remove the scratches. After the sisal I use a spiral sewn and can't remove the sisal scratches. I end up with a dull shine. I have gone back and resanded to be certain that I have all the sand scratches out. I also tried sanding with 1200 on a finished piece, and cant remove the scratches with emery and a spiral sewn wheel. Any suggestions would be appreciated. I have also tried a grey for stainless and green, always using separate spiral sewn wheels.
            Thanks, Ron
            Ron;
            Don't know your "personal method" of buffing, but most folks have one.. I settled on a "left then right" method of buffing stainless trim..
            I'll explain.. First off, I tape a length of stainless trim to a one inch thick (3/4" finished) board.. The length of the board is "a bit" longer than the trim piece (about two inches on each end) and the width of the board depends on the width of the trim (example: a 3" wide trim piece would sit on a four or six inch wide board).. I tape the trim in several places and ONLY buff BETWEEN the strips of tape.. I buff at about 45 degrees to my body.. that is, I hold the board in my left hand below the buffing wheel and my right hand above the buffing wheel.. After buffing full length, I reverse my hands and the bottom of the board goes from left to right (zat make sense?) so that I am NOW buffing about 90 degrees to the first buffing.. After you have gotten the piece where you want it (are happy with the finish), NOW retape the work piece in different places than originally taped and, using the same method, buff the areas where it was taped originally. Being taped to a "One By" helps to prevent wrapping the stainless trim around the buffing wheel (been there, done that, No Fun!!) it also helps to "lay into" the wheel a bit harder, IF NECESSARY!! The biggest advantage is it keeps your fingers & hands away from the spinning buffing wheel..
            Hope this little tip helps.
            Chas.

            Charles

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            • #7
              Thanks Jag, I have gotten a few pieces done and looking good not perfect, but I've spent way to much time on them and haven't been consistent at all. I had just spent a lot of time on a part that I just can't get a shine on, so I have now tried a few others with no good results.
              I have tried similar to what you are saying but I just can't seem to get any kind of cut with a spiral sewn wheel. After I sand I cut with a sisal wheel and black emry and get a decent shine with some wheel scratches and I can't get them out after that. I have sanded up to 3000 grit and can't remove them with a spiral sewn wheel regardless of which compound I use.
              On another note and I'm asking because I'm trying to learn not criticize. Most of what I read and videos say to buff parallel to the trim, and use light pressure,let the wheel do the work. Do you know a reason or advantage to each method? As I have said I tried both mostly stuck to the first method because that is what I was told, but am having no luck and trying to learn something. Thanks.

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