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  • Air tool recommendations

    Hello,

    I have tried a little polishing of various motorcycle parts with a standard drill and a kit I got from Caswell but want to try some die grinders with my spiffy new air compressor.

    Looking for some recommendations for what to get, and is the $$ difference between Sears and Harbor Freight worth it?

    Thanks,

    Jim

  • #2
    We use alot of Central Pnuematic at work. I don't think it's a high end name like Snap-On but they last just as long as any brand we've ever tried, including Snap-On. I'd go with a cheaper one myself after seeing what they go through at work. Someone else might have a different opinion though. Good luck.

    Steve

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    • #3
      Same opinion here. Main thing is to keep them lubricated to prolong tool life. Die grinders just flat wear out with the RPM's they turn. The cheap ones will last about as long as the expensive ones if you take care of them and you can buy 2 or 3 for the same price.

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      • #4
        Sears has a "Companion" brand 1/4" die grinder for only $20 - $30. I'm going to stop and get one today. It's only 1/3 horse but it comes in a case with some tools, and has an adapter to use 1/8" tools in it so you can also use Dremel-sized stuff. If I remember I'll post a review of it here.

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        • #5
          Thanks for the replies.

          If the 1/4" grinder is like this one, you might save $10.

          LINK VIOLATED TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF USE AND WAS REMOVED

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          • #6
            SoFlaJim,

            I got the Sears grinder- it's the exact same one. Thanks for the link but I had to get it Sunday and Harbor Freight wasn't open. Another 10 bucks down the drain, lol...

            Coulda used it too, 'cause yesterday my compressor motor went out and I had to go get another compressor from Sears. Oh well, that's another couple of valve covers I'l have to polish to pay for the equipment...

            BTW, that little grinder works great/

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            • #7
              why pay 10 bucks for a tool that will not last. spend the extra cash on a good one and it will last you a lot longer..... this is another cas of the product is only as good as the price... been there and when it breaks during a job you are stuck and don't have a spare ...

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              • #8
                I suppose it depends on how much you use a tool. Use it a lot, you need a good one. Use it only a little, why pay 6 times the price? At these prices I could have a couple of spares and still be paying less.

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                • #9
                  Ok, I got the grinder I was talking about but it's got a 1/4" collet. The adapter I bought for my drill doesn't fit, what should I be using with this grinder? Is it just too small for the 4" wheels?

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                  • #10
                    I wouldn't use 4" wheels if you got a die grinder (unless you can control the speed). If it's 10,000 rpms +, that's _way_ too fast for a 4" wheels. Your fpm would be about three times recommended speed, plus the wheel is likely to fly apart. See if the max rpms are marked on the wheel.

                    I use cart rolls or small drum sanders in a grinder. For 4" wheels use a drill or flex shaft at slower rpms.

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                    • #11
                      if you are talking about a straight line die grinder i suggest the 1/4" shank felt bob set. they come in various shapes and with greaseless the should move metal fast. also as mpierich suggested the cart rolls or drums would be good also since they come in various shapes and grits. i have read in this forum that some people have not had the best of luck with felt and regular coupound but i have been using it lately w/ my dremel and have had good luck it is just slow moving in a dremel, do to lack of torque, in a die grinder it should work fine. let us know what works for you so we can try it if we have not already, and as always best of luck.
                      when in doubt polish it out/ why replace it when you can refinish it
                      G2 Polishing and Powdercoating

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                      • #12
                        wow, looks like I don't get to use my new pneumatic toys! I have used a drill previously, but had a guy tell me he had way better results with air tools.

                        The max rpm of the grinder is 20k at 90psi, I suppose I could slow it down with less pressure but I still wouldn't know how fast it was really going.

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                        • #13
                          Get you a pressure regulator with a gauge and start out using low air pressure, say 15 psig. If the grinder is bogged down by applying any kind of pressure to the part, go up to 20 or even 25 psig. Keep trying until you reach a speed that you can tell you are making progress. That's what I did with the felt bobs and greaseless compound because I read where they didn't take to well to high rpm's. If you can't get ahold of a regulator, let me know and I'll see if there's not one laying around some where. Later.

                          Steve

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