Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Wheel Speed and scratches

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Wheel Speed and scratches

    Anybody try a comparison between coloring-up aluminum at different speeds? I've seen indications that high speeds can make it tough to get the color. When I get a good buffer I might go for a dual-speed model.

  • #2
    Re: Wheel Speed and scratches

    I just encountered this the other day. Nothing seemed to work after a vent/emery combo so I slowed down to about 1800 rpm with a loose/white and it started looking better. Even then it wasn't to my satisfaction. However it did start looking nice when I changed locations on the wheel. Instead of using 25 degrees below center, I used the center, maybe even above center. I tried this trick a while back when I was trying to buff some scratches out next to a weld. Ya'll might think I'm nuts, but it worked both times.

    Steve

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Wheel Speed and scratches

      Originally posted by easleysp
      I just encountered this the other day. Nothing seemed to work after a vent/emery combo so I slowed down to about 1800 rpm with a loose/white and it started looking better. Even then it wasn't to my satisfaction. However it did start looking nice when I changed locations on the wheel. Instead of using 25 degrees below center, I used the center, maybe even above center. I tried this trick a while back when I was trying to buff some scratches out next to a weld. Ya'll might think I'm nuts, but it worked both times.

      Steve
      Regarding the wheel speed, one thing I can figger is that the "centrifugal" effect is flinging the wheel threads out there with less force at lower speeds, hence slapping the workpiece not as hard. If that's how it works then a smaller wheel at the same rpm's might have the same effect (?).

      Far as the wheel position...yep I think you're nuts but so am I, lol. Could it be that on the front side of the wheel the threads are not fighting gravity and so are more "free-floating"? Spacey territory....

      Anybody know if a rheostat would burn out buffer motor?

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Wheel Speed and scratches

        It must only be on certain days of the week that slower speeds do a better job. Sunday ain't one of 'em. I'm back turning WFO with a loose/white combo and it's lookin' pretty good to me. Ok so maybe it's not the actual day of the week. But I'm pretty sure it's got somethin' to do with the weather. It's cool and damp this morning. Everything seems to work different on days like today. Unfortunately there hasn't been many of them lately.

        I'm almost certain you have to get a certain motor to use a rheostat, but I could be wrong. A guy at work was trying to make his kid a pitching machine using a rheostat to contorl the motor and he was having trouble finding a motor that worked. He ended up using a motor from a treadmill and I believe it was a 3 phase with an inverter. If you can find a DC motor cheap, I've got a speed controller you might be interested in. Line voltage is either 115 or 230, I'd have to get the output info for you. Up side: lots o' torque. Down side: low RPM's. I guess you could always use pulley's to get what you wanted. Here's what I did. A fella at work got me 3 hp drive from our plant that was shut down. Found a 2 hp motor. Had another fella at our machine shop make a shaft for me. Got a couple of bearings, some scrap metal and did a little fabricatin'. If you'd like to know more about using an ac drive let me know and I'll tell you all I can. They're pretty cheap these days, especially those that are obsolete. Hope this helps. Later on!

        Steve

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Wheel Speed and scratches

          Originally posted by easleysp
          It must only be on certain days of the week that slower speeds do a better job...But I'm pretty sure it's got somethin' to do with the weather. It's cool and damp this morning. Everything seems to work different on days like today. Unfortunately there hasn't been many of them lately.
          Must be a gravity fluctuation...LOL, I have another story about the weather thing...see my other post.

          Originally posted by easleysp
          I'm almost certain you have to get a certain motor to use a rheostat, but I could be wrong....A fella at work got me 3 hp drive from our plant that was shut down. Found a 2 hp motor. Had another fella at our machine shop make a shaft for me. Got a couple of bearings, some scrap metal and did a little fabricatin'. If you'd like to know more about using an ac drive let me know and I'll tell you all I can. They're pretty cheap these days, especially those that are obsolete. Hope this helps. Later on!
          Steve
          I'm not an equipment wonk...not sure what a 3hp drive even is, but I will as soon as I get over to Google. If you feel like writing you can fill me in here, and thanks.

          Right now I'm starting to build my dream belt sander (poor-man style), but better buffing equipment is the next project.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Wheel Speed and scratches

            Do some googlin' on AC drives or go to howstuffworks and it will give you the lowdown. I'd be more than happy to explain to you what I know about them, but I that's a lot more typing than I really want to do. If you want, I can give you call and tell you over the phone. Email or PM your phone number and I'll give you a call later.

            Steve

            Comment

            Working...
            X