Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Polishing tight corners. New guy.

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Polishing tight corners. New guy.

    Hello all. My first post after doing many a searches so not to bother you with a drawn out question. Some of the picture links are broken in the threads explaining my question.

    This is a picture of a vtec solenoid that I'm trying to polish. I've polished an alternator bracket before, but now I'm trying to do this guy. I have a rotory tool and discs, however, do I need to purchase the tiny, thin sanding attachment? The grit looks too hard. Also, since my rotory is adjustable, what rpm should I use when I polish the corners?

    Any help would be great. This is a great forum. I'm grateful that it's here.
    Attached Files
    ~If you tell the truth, you don't have to remember anything~ Mark Twain

  • #2
    Re: Polishing tight corners. New guy.

    There are dremel bits called cratex that work very well. They are rubberized with grit in them. I don't know if HD carries them, I usually get them from machine shop suppliers.
    SS

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Polishing tight corners. New guy.

      Originally posted by sswee
      There are dremel bits called cratex that work very well. They are rubberized with grit in them. I don't know if HD carries them, I usually get them from machine shop suppliers.
      SS
      Thank you kindly. I'll give it a shot.
      ~If you tell the truth, you don't have to remember anything~ Mark Twain

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Polishing tight corners. New guy.

        also for the final polish i would get some of the felt points. use them with regular compound. also they can be shaped to what ever you need with a little sand paper and patience.
        when in doubt polish it out/ why replace it when you can refinish it
        G2 Polishing and Powdercoating

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Polishing tight corners. New guy.

          Originally posted by sswee
          There are dremel bits called cratex that work very well. They are rubberized with grit in them. I don't know if HD carries them, I usually get them from machine shop suppliers.
          SS
          This is what you're talking about, I figure. Instead of getting a variety, I'll get a number of cone shaped pieces. A medium grit would be sufficient? No more than 20,000 rpm? I suppose I'll feel it when I use it. There must be a bunch of Polishing Jedi Knights in here that can feel when the right pressure is being utilized.
          Attached Files
          ~If you tell the truth, you don't have to remember anything~ Mark Twain

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Polishing tight corners. New guy.

            Originally posted by pickleboy
            also for the final polish i would get some of the felt points. use them with regular compound. also they can be shaped to what ever you need with a little sand paper and patience.
            And you are referring to these, correct?

            Thanks again to you both for your help.
            Attached Files
            ~If you tell the truth, you don't have to remember anything~ Mark Twain

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Polishing tight corners. New guy.

              Looks like you have the tools. Now you just have to get the feel. Like most of us you'll have a few oops but hopefully not much worse.
              SS

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Polishing tight corners. New guy.

                Have you thought about trying to find a gunsmith and see if he will let you try his tumbler. Since this is a one time deal...it would save alot of time....
                www.chrome-plater.blogspot.com

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Polishing tight corners. New guy.

                  Originally posted by fly
                  Have you thought about trying to find a gunsmith and see if he will let you try his tumbler. Since this is a one time deal...it would save alot of time....
                  Hmmm... It's a vtec solenoid for a d16z6 Honda Vtec motor. It connects to the back of the intake manifold and it's operated by oil pressure. Do you think that it would cause problems? I purchased a new motor, and don't necessarily NEED this piece, so I thought that I'd practice on something difficult.

                  Thanks for the suggestion. I'm doing my best to be as self-sufficient as I can.
                  ~If you tell the truth, you don't have to remember anything~ Mark Twain

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Polishing tight corners. New guy.

                    If you disassemble the part it shouldn't cause problems, but if you need the practice then have fun with it and try different things.
                    www.chrome-plater.blogspot.com

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Polishing tight corners. New guy.

                      Originally posted by chefboiali
                      And you are referring to these, correct?

                      Thanks again to you both for your help.
                      yes that is what i mentioned. and let me say that is a pretty impressive assortment. as for the jedi knights of polish, it is absolutely something that you get from doing the work. i can explain it all day but there is a feel that you will develop over time of doing it yourself that cant be taught.
                      when in doubt polish it out/ why replace it when you can refinish it
                      G2 Polishing and Powdercoating

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Polishing tight corners. New guy.

                        where did you purchase all the tips for the rotery tool I only find polishing tips that have 2-3 felt tips... I Need more and I can't find the seprate.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Polishing tight corners. New guy.

                          I actually got them on ebay. I don't mean to disrespect Caswell by telling people to look on ebay, however that is where I found them.
                          ~If you tell the truth, you don't have to remember anything~ Mark Twain

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Polishing tight corners. New guy.

                            So I decided to put the vtec solenoid on hold and start on an alternator bracket, and the bracket that holds the power steering pump. I started with a sanding disc on my dremel, lightly on the top just to cut into it. Then like magic, the 220, 400, 600, 1000 went GREAT. Couldn't find 1500 at my local hardware store, so didn't worry about it. Got some black rouge to start and red to finish using felt polishing pads to on my dremel, and I got scratches. You can't see them very well on the pics (the pieces look GREAT at a distance) lol, but how can I NOT get the scratches next time? I'm still saving money so that I can get a buffer that'll last me. I don't wanna get a weak one that's cheap and end up buying another one. I'm done with that.
                            Attached Files
                            Last edited by chefboiali; 05-07-2006, 11:31 PM.
                            ~If you tell the truth, you don't have to remember anything~ Mark Twain

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Polishing tight corners. New guy.

                              First off, congrats on a job well done. Those turned out nice. Second, judging by the pics but not actually being able to see the part up close in person, I'm gonna guess that the scratches you have left are buffing marks. Do the scratches only seem to show up when you can see the light reflecting off the part from tilting it at certain angles? Are the scratches totally random, going in a million directions and give off the impression of looking at an aurora borealis? If so, those would be buffing marks.
                              "Some people are like sandpaper: they may delight in the misery they inflict by rubbing up against you, but in the end you will come out smooth and polished while they'll just be ugly, wrinkled, and used up." - Beyonce Knowles

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X