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Polishing Aluminum Wheels

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  • CamaroMike
    replied
    I would but Id rather keep the money, and enhance my musle endurance

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  • marsfrogie
    replied
    Lol, I think Mike is training for the strongman competition.

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  • rpen
    replied
    Why not invest in a flexible shaft? I know they're expensive, but it would save the wear and tear on your body.

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  • CamaroMike
    replied
    Oh yes, I suggest you get a back brace. At first that rim is light but after going over it for a while it gets reall heavy.

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  • rpen
    replied
    I realize what you meant (a bench grinder with buffing wheels)...I was just wondering if you actually carry the rim and hold it up to the buffer?

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  • CamaroMike
    replied
    This is what I mean

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  • rpen
    replied
    CamaroMike...you use a bench grinder to polish wheels

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  • CamaroMike
    replied
    I use a air powered die grinder with 120,320 grit sanding rolls and tapered rolls. A da sander with 120,320 grit glue on back sanding disks. I used a bench grinder 3/4 horse I think. Then a 6" sisal polsihing wheel with black grease, then onto a 6" cloth sewn wheel with tripoli grease, and finaly finishing it off with a 6" loose buff.

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  • rpen
    replied
    CamaroMike, what tools/methods do you use for polishing wheels?

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  • CamaroMike
    replied
    polishing rims is easy once you get the hang of it. Heres one of my own. Please excuse the crappy paint it sucks I know, and I dont have hub caps cause I plan on painting all my rims when it gets warm enough to work on my car outside.But at least the polished part is good.

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  • mcaswell
    replied
    I found a great resource for everyone. It specifically discusses polishing rims. The author is a customer of ours.

    http://www.78ta.com/rims.htm

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  • Josh
    replied
    a variable speed dremel for the small antique parts will work well

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  • rpen
    replied
    Anyone else?

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  • mcaswell
    replied
    I expect that for big jobs, most people here are using a handheld buffer with 6" wheels.

    An electric drill works well too, with an arbor adapter and 4" wheels. The smaller wheels make the job go more slowly though.

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  • rpen
    replied
    Ok, I set myself up for that. It is a beautiful machine ...BUT...
    1. I will be doing this part time.
    2. Cost IS a factor (don't have 12 grand). Would like to spend <$1000.
    3. I also want to be able to polish other parts (engine parts/auto trim/etc).
    Let me be more specifc. For under $1000, what would you (anyone) suggest that I buy to set myself up to be able to polish anything from auto parts/trim to rims to antiques. I'm doing this both as a hobby and source of extra income.

    If you can (I know I'm asking a lot ) be specific about what tools you use to polish certain items. I've done some polishing before, mostly by hand, and that is just too much work for too little result.

    Thanks.

    Leave a comment:

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