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  • Blast cabinet dust extraction

    I am not sure what to get.
    I see TP Tools sells a pretty nice one called VAC-35

    But I can get a ShopVac on black friday at Lowes. For the VAC-35 price of $200 I can get 6 shopvacs!

    If I put a shopvac hepa grade filter that should keep the area fairly clean right. (I use the blast cab outside also) But I think it would also clog fairly quickly, should I get some kind of bag or prefilter for it also?

    The problem with shopvac at full speed it pulls in a crazy vacuum and make my gloves too stiff, since I silicone caulked my blaster pretty well. I think I need to slow it down with a dimmer switch to get it just right.

  • #2
    Re: Blast cabinet dust extraction

    I drilled some holes on the opposite side of the cabinet to get rid of the stiff glove problem. Put a shield in front of it, never have a problem. You'll find all the silicone wasn't necessary once you get the vac going.

    I run mine with a bag only. It catches the finest dust, which isn't worth recycling anyways. I started with a hepa, but it clogged up much to fast.
    Originally posted by PoorOwner View Post
    I am not sure what to get.
    I see TP Tools sells a pretty nice one called VAC-35

    But I can get a ShopVac on black friday at Lowes. For the VAC-35 price of $200 I can get 6 shopvacs!

    If I put a shopvac hepa grade filter that should keep the area fairly clean right. (I use the blast cab outside also) But I think it would also clog fairly quickly, should I get some kind of bag or prefilter for it also?

    The problem with shopvac at full speed it pulls in a crazy vacuum and make my gloves too stiff, since I silicone caulked my blaster pretty well. I think I need to slow it down with a dimmer switch to get it just right.
    James Bateman

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    • #3
      Re: Blast cabinet dust extraction

      Originally posted by PoorOwner View Post
      I am not sure what to get.
      I see TP Tools sells a pretty nice one called VAC-35

      I think I need to slow it down with a dimmer switch to get it just right.
      PoorOwner; (who isn't?)
      I don't believe the motor used on the ShopVac (brand) is "controllable" from the standpoint of reducing voltage to reduce RPM (thus suction).. You might burn out the motor.
      I have a Five Horse (peak), Sixteen Gallon Wet/Dry ShopVac.. I killed the motor the first week I had it, vac'ing up sand (ShopVac warrantied it without any issues-- this was about fifteen years ago).. Seems everything that the ShopVac picks-up goes thru the motor.. I bought the "fluted" canister (corrogated paper) filter (for dry use only) then bought a thin paper filter (looks like those hair covers used in fast service) that slipped over the canister. "Some" sand dust was still getting past these filters and into the motor (as evidenced when I blew some dust out of the motor)..
      I settled on a simple solution.. "Vacuum Bags".. ShopVac makes them to fit the capacity of container.. ALL incoming debris, dirt, wood chips, dust, etc., goes into the bag before anything goes thru the motor! This has totally eliminated and sand dust getting to the motor, eliminated the slip-on and fluted filters from clogging up (which I still use in case the bag slips off it's "spigot").. and the "Large" Vac Bag (handles the sixteen gallon size) holds a helluva lot of sand dust.
      Maybe this will help you, as well..
      Charles

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      • #4
        Re: Blast cabinet dust extraction

        Yeah, must be the same ones I was referring to. They add up to a lot of surface area for filtering, and maintain full vacuum 'till they fill up. Usually emptying them does no good as they tear, but they last a while and are pretty cheap.
        James Bateman

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        • #5
          Re: Blast cabinet dust extraction

          My blast cabinet came with an adjustable door to relieve vacuum but I put a flapper valve in place of it. (Read that as a piece of old inner tube.) When I'm not blasting and pumping lots of air into the cabinet, the flapper opens so the dust collector doesn't pull a vacuum in the cabinet. It also keeps the motor from overheating. As soon as I start blasting, the flapper starts to close.

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          • #6
            Re: Blast cabinet dust extraction

            As woodjames says drill some holes on the backside of the cabinet and put a shield over them and that will solve the vacuum problem. I drilled mine at the upper right of the back side of the cabinet, have the vacuum outlet at the upper left side of the cabinet, and this results in a cross flow which seems to pull the dust right out.

            I burned out the motors of a couple of shop vacs and finally bought one of TP Tools blasting cabinet vacuums. It does a much better job than did the shop vacs of clearing the dust out of the cabinet while I work and is designed in such a way that it protects the vacuum motor from micro dust particles.

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            • #7
              Re: Blast cabinet dust extraction

              When I'm up in the USA, I get my shop vacs for dust extraction at yard sales for five dollars each. I won't pay more than that. I don't stop at yard sales, but I look for vacs from the street.

              R

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