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  • #16
    Documentation and Results

    I know this isn't a subject that we really havn't gone over that much, but I just wanted to key you all in on the importance of documenting "how" you do things around your coating shop. Everybody has thier own unique way of application of powder,sandblasting,masking,cure times and temps. This is all YOUR process. You know what works best for you. If you're anything like me and have 9 million other things going on in life, a notepad and pen are your best tools in coating to help you remember those important factoids that may be easily forgotten about when you come up against something that you've done before but are very tricky. Quite often I revisit old notes and papers of things that I've done in the past to gaurantee my results for the future. Let's face it.... we're all only human and human's don't have as good a memory as we'd like to believe. As some might attest on here, I like to know the whole process on paper as I'm doing it so I can reproduce results easily enough if they are successful. Also... if something went wrong, I can look at the paperwork to see where my errors are and not make the same mistake twice ( hopefully ). It only takes a minute to do and it's REALLY worth it's weight in gold in the future. A widget example if I may.....

    I have a widget that I'd like to coat. The customer wants it blasted,cleaned,phosphated and coated with a base of bright red and a top coat of clear. The widget is made of stainless steel though. AHA! There's always a catch,right? Assuming I've done this before, I'll go back to my notes and follow the results that I've had success with and then repeat them knowing I have money in the bank. If not, I'll get out a scrap of paper and it will look something like this.

    1) Mask widget with silicone plugs ( threaded holes ) and sandblast.
    2) Sandblast black oxide at 90 PSI
    3) remove masking and solvent wash in isopropyl alcohol with stiff brush
    4) Hang and air dry for 45 minutes. Blow off with clean air @ 90 PSI.
    5) Phosphate wash. 20 min in full solution ( Caswell p/n SSB370 )
    6) Mask for coating. Silicone plugs and green tape ( Caswell p/n Prod #### and p/n pctape1)
    7) Basecoat with red ( Caswell p/n PCP56022 ) cure 410F @ 16 minutes. Remove from oven and let "air quench" for 5 minutes.
    8 ) Top coat with clear ( Caswell p/n PCP4444 ) cure 410F @ 16 minutes. Shut off oven and open door. Remove when cooled to room temp.
    9) Unmask and trim.
    10) end process.

    That's basically what it looks like. This list tells me how I did it, where to get the materials to acheive the same results if need be and what my cure schedule was. Assuming you put this paper in a folder somewhere.... it doesn't matter if you need to go back to this "recipe" a week from now or 10 years from now. It's all the same and the results are still there. It also serves the purpose that if you missed a step you can see clearly against other results where you went wrong. We'll omit step number 3 for example's sake. You take the part out of the oven and there are bubbles all over it. Oops, what went wrong? Ahhhh... I can see we didn't degrease properly with a solvent to get the oils off and that's where I went wrong. Now I know better. See how that helps now?

    Invest 3-4 dollars in some paper and pencils. Get yourself a nice 3-ringed binder or a student type "trapper keeper". Don't be afraid to scribble down ANYTHING that might pertain to what you are doing. If you have a digital camera, take pictures and print them out and staple the whole thing together if you wish. It's all in the name of consistant success. The more knowledge you have, even if it's on paper, the better you will be a coater in the long run. I gaurantee it. Hope that helps somebody out there.... Russ

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    • #17
      I'd like to add a little trick that I mentioned in another post here so hopefully it will help someone with booth cleanup and color changes.

      I was admiring my handy work one day when I realized that it was going to be a royal pain to clean the excess powder from the inside of my booth. Even though it has a filter and fan, there would still be a pretty good amount of stray powder in the corners. I thought that I didn't want to waste too much powder so I didn't want to rely on a vacume, so I decided to use the closed circuit of the process to reclaim the powder. Now to get to the point... Electricity is your friend. I went to my local Home depot and picked up a plastic spackle tray... It's about 10" long and tapers down from 4" wide. At the bottom I put a piece of angle iron with a bolt attached. I used a jumper lead(wire with alligator clips) to complete the grounding circuit. The parts hang pretty high in my booth so the additional ground doesn't pull powder away from the parts. When the still charged powder falls to the bottom of the booth it's attracted to the grounded metal piece and sticks to it. When you finish coating you just disconnect the jumper and set the tray aside and let it discharge then do the rest of your clean up. A word of advice from someone who spent many years working in shops...Always clean up when you finish your job, you don't want to face a cleanup when you go to start your next job.

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      • #18
        ovens

        Clean the suckers like you were cleaning a part....specially if your using a home type oven...strange things float around in hot air.....
        lesson learned,,,hard way..
        Pro-Tech Powder Coating
        93976 Ocean Way
        541-247-8168
        [email protected]
        Gold Beach,Oregon

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        • #19
          Re: ovens

          Originally posted by Blademan
          Clean the suckers like you were cleaning a part....specially if your using a home type oven...strange things float around in hot air.....
          lesson learned,,,hard way..
          Blade, Check out my Fiero (20 year old) upper A-arms.. 120-psi for 3 minutes each - Got sick of siphon, pot & cup blasters.. so mixed parts from them all and made my own.., Stumbled upon a way to blast that is like no other!, So stupid its FUNNY, But if you cant calibrate it correctly and know what to look for it doesnt work right..

          Next is the oven as we turn rust into GOLD.. , A nice little 4'x 8' trailer that will be mobile.., Just got the fans for it today, But steel will need to wait until after Christmas (3-kids), CANT WAIT !

          Anyone want some kids?

          Regards, Rob in NH
          Attached Files
          Last edited by BerkelUSA; 12-08-2005, 04:01 PM.
          DIY Groups Powder-Coating - Metal-Casting - Metal-Chipping - Metal-Polishing - Fiberglas - CNC Tables - GOT LINKS?

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          • #20
            Re: Tips and Tricks

            I would first like to say I am in no way associated with Ammoman, Pablasters or Rob.

            With that said I have dealt with Rob on several occasions lately all the way back to buying some hard to find ammo from him earlier in the year. I bought his plans for the PaBlaster and joined his Yahoo group for DIY'ers (Do It Yourself). He has an awesome group with some really ingenious ideas that apply to powder coating. He is very respected in his group I plan to build my on PaBlaster in the next couple weeks and I will post back how well it works.

            I?m not trying to sound like a salesman for Rob but simply wanted to let the masses here know he is a good guy.


            Jason
            Auto-Cycle PC

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            • #21
              Re: Tips and Tricks

              Thanks Jason.. Cant say I remember all the names from the list.. - But I TRY !..

              It's OK tho... Your not the only one who know's me here.., But either way thanks for the compliments my friend..

              Rob
              DIY Groups Powder-Coating - Metal-Casting - Metal-Chipping - Metal-Polishing - Fiberglas - CNC Tables - GOT LINKS?

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              • #22
                Re: Tips and Tricks

                Rob, I just sent payment through paypal. Can't wait to get the plans and build my own. get rid of the crappy blaster I have now. Darn thing eat's way to much sand and air
                Dan Pesonen
                Bandit Powder Coat <<From Powder to Perfection>>
                Forest Grove, BC Canada

                Personal motto:
                "If it ain't broke, modify somethin till it is"

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                • #23
                  Re: Tips and Tricks

                  Invite sent!.. ty - Dont miss the photo's area.. One member made it from a Beer-Keg.. another from a water tank.. Great buncha people and no spam from that group EVER.
                  DIY Groups Powder-Coating - Metal-Casting - Metal-Chipping - Metal-Polishing - Fiberglas - CNC Tables - GOT LINKS?

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                  • #24
                    Re: Tips and Tricks

                    I agree great group I ordered the plans now a few months later see if I can find em...LOL winter is a good time to make stuff!!!

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                    • #25
                      Re: Tips and Tricks

                      Guys, could you start another thread and link to it? Not to be a PITA, but when I visit this thread, I'm looking for tips on powder coating and not information on another forum or group.

                      BTW, I went to the site and found it rather difficult to enjoy because of the format. Being used to modern forums and their setups, trying to view topics and posts on your site seems very tedious and antiquated. Being someone who doesn't have time to struggle with a site, I'd love to see what all the hubbub is about should you ever upgrade it.

                      Please, back on topic...

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                      • #26
                        Re: Tips and Tricks

                        Well it is about powder coating, if you look its about the prep work and how its done. More importantly how it is done more efficiently which in turn helps your results and turn around times.

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                        • #27
                          Re: Tips and Tricks

                          Originally posted by Banditperformance View Post
                          Rob, I just sent payment through paypal. Can't wait to get the plans and build my own. get rid of the crappy blaster I have now. Darn thing eat's way to much sand and air
                          Originally posted by BerkelUSA View Post
                          Invite sent!.. ty - Dont miss the photo's area.. One member made it from a Beer-Keg.. another from a water tank.. Great buncha people and no spam from that group EVER.
                          Good tips... Why not contribute all that info here instead of requiring an invitation code some place else? It's spam for another forum, period, and would be removed on most other forums.

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                          • #28
                            Re: Tips and Tricks

                            The funny thing is that not only is he directing people and information away from this forum, but he's selling a product as well. This is the thing that really gives me a [sarcasm]chuckle[/sarcasm]:

                            Great buncha people and here's the real kicker! and no spam from that group EVER.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Re: Tips and Tricks

                              I have been troubleshooting my setup for a long time. Ive been able to do 3 coats on some occasion, but cannot do 2nd coats most of the time.

                              I though it was humidity in my lines (big compressor) so I put a water trap on compressor.

                              Then thought about ground issue. I drove a 9 feet long grounding rod in earth, and not in sandy soil, great ground. No dice.

                              Then I tried putting 50 feets of tubing and a dessicant dryer just before my powder gun. This dessicant dryer DOES grab water as it changes color. But, I cant do seconds coat still.

                              Now im pretty sure its humidity in the surrounding air. The place I shoot my parts in is not temperature or humidity controled.


                              Briefy, this is request for you guys, If you could tell me what your humidity levels are when you shoot your 2nd or 3rd coats. I'll buy a meter and give you my humidity readings.


                              Thank, a friend is waiting on parts, but it needs pearl in the clear, so I cannot hot flock it because it makes blotches of pearl.

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                              • #30
                                Re: Tips and Tricks

                                [QUOTE=Badger;38205]The funny thing is that not only is he directing people and information away from this forum, but he's selling a product as well. This is the thing that really gives me a chuckle

                                This from a guy with 12 posts? I've been here for YEARS.. and bought plenty of polishing/powdercoating goodies.. spare me!

                                Go buy a blaster from China and see what kind of technical support you get.. ZERO and sorry but 1 outta 10 posts re-direct people back to here.. we all buy Caswell stuff and test it out.. one hand washes the other thing..

                                Members: 1,342

                                Spare me..
                                DIY Groups Powder-Coating - Metal-Casting - Metal-Chipping - Metal-Polishing - Fiberglas - CNC Tables - GOT LINKS?

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