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how do i know what type of blasting material to use?

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  • 11111111
    replied
    My cabinet came with the option for a hand trigger or a foot trigger for the air supply. any recomendations?

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  • tomg552001
    replied
    Ahh ok, you purchased one with a dust collector already....i was thinking you bought a cheaper hobby cabinet which usually dosnt have a collection port

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  • 11111111
    replied
    shop vac

    when you say hook up a shop vac you mean if you dont have a vacuum sytem on the cabinet? The blaster I have came with a very large recycling vacuum system. Its about three feet tall and about a foot in dia.
    Or do I need to hook up the shop vac for another reason?
    Jeff

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  • tomg552001
    replied
    Haha, my black magnum is only $7.99 per 100lbs

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  • tomg552001
    replied
    Not a problem, thats what we are here for. We were all in your shoes one day, and most of us had no help, only trial and error. Coating is a lot of fun, but always remember to not get frustrated when things do go wrong, as they will no matter what, lol. As far as telling if your media is worn it will look like its dust, and not like you first got it. You will see that the particles are significantly smaller and what not. Also, make sure you hook up a shopvac to your dust cabinet. Media causes a heck of a lot of dust. home depot sells a attachment in the shopvac area for like $10. Good luck.

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  • Hemi-T
    replied
    I buy Black Magnum abrasive at Menards. It runs about $5 for a 50 lb bag. There is a specialty abrasive place about 10 miles away, but Menards is close and almost as cheap.

    After awhile, the grit breaks down into dust and doesn't cut well anymore. I use a shop vac with a water trap made out of a 5 gallon bucket to capture the dust. When the grit doesn't cut well anymore, just drop it out the bottom of the cabinet, and put in new grit. I blast at 175 psi, so I'm kind of hard on grit, but it lasts pretty well.

    Hemi-T

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  • 11111111
    replied
    when to change

    How do you tell when you need to change the blasting media? I have done lots of blasting of parts here and thier but never with the same equipment. (friends)
    How do you know when you need to change out the old media?
    Thanks
    Jeff

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  • 11111111
    replied
    blasting

    Thank you for the helpfull info on tips. Just so I am clear on the media I use, any of the ones you listed work with aluminum and steel?
    I have to say this is great that thier are such quick responses and you all are so helpful. I cant wait to get started I love a good project and I have been putting parts together for a few years for this one and being able to do the coatings myself will sure make it a lot more fun for myself.
    thanks again
    Jeff

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  • tomg552001
    replied
    Hmm, well when i blasted using a straight aluminum oxide i used to wear nozzles out real fast...besides a carbide nozzle only runs $25

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  • Hemi-T
    replied
    For hobbyist purposes, ceramic nozzles work just fine. They may wear out fast if you're doing commercial production work, but for hobby scale jobs they last a long time. A new sand blaster will usually come with a couple of spares, and you can buy replacements at Menards for under $5 for a package of three. If you wear out more than $10 worth of ceramic nozzles, *then* you might consider buying a carbide nozzle, but on a hobby scale that will take a loooong time.

    Hemi-T

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  • tomg552001
    replied
    Welcome to the powder coating world. If you are blasting strictly to create a good powder coatable surface use a coarse material such as aluminum oxide, silicone carbide, black magnum, coal slag etc. These will work best to create a nice profile for adhesion. Let me warn you in advance, using these with a ceramic nozzle is not going to work to well. Lay a few dollars out there and get a Carbide Nozzle and Air jet, it will save you time and money in the long run, as they take forever to wear out compared to ceramic. Ceramic, depending on your blast pressure etc can wear out in the matter of a few hours.

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  • how do i know what type of blasting material to use?

    I just ordered a powder coating machine and would like to start preping some parts to be coated. I also just bought a blasting cabinet and am not sure what type of material to put in it or if it matters? I understand the differences in grit, but I am not sure if using a particular type or brand will affect adhesion?
    Thanks in advance for the help
    Jeff
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