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  • tomg552001
    replied
    I wouldnt suggest finishing and blasting in the same area. After time, no matter how clean you are, you will have some cross contamination. Slow down a little and rethink your ideas and don't get ahead of yourself. Finishing with liquid and powder in one booth may be alright, but blasting is not highly recommended.

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  • ACinVA
    replied
    My goal is to be able to paint and powder items as large as 3' square. Since I'm also painting, and not just powdercoating, in this booth I wanted to make it's as clean running as possible. Unfortunately, my severe shortage of workspace may have me trying to blast in the same confined area. Not my first choice but it'll just mean doing a top-notch clean between blasting and painting. Whatever ventilation/filtration system I rig up it's got to be easily convertible.

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  • non-stick
    replied
    In all my time as a coater. I've used perhaps 3 booths that were totally enclosed and filtered,etc. All the rest are "open" like you have described and draw in ambient unfiltered air past you, then into the booth. It's not really a huge deal unless you have a lot of stray things flying past you. Basically... you are making a powder coating "room". Much like a room set aside for just sandblasting, am I right? Like I said.... some places have that but it's not necessary in the hobbyist form (or even in most industrial forms, truth be known). I'd build a standard "booth" to coat in and keep the opening a good size where you stand and don't foresee any problems with that. The air coming past you won't be such a pressure or volume that it will pull the powder right off your part. Quite the contrary.... if your powder comes flying off, then something's wrong. If you want to slow the volume down because you feel it's excessive.... I've put a big square plate approx 3" in front of the hole for suction, this way the air gets slowed down yet still evacuates the chamber. What sisze parts are you planning on doing anyways? Just curious..... Russ

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  • ACinVA
    replied
    I've been drafting a design for a small paint/powder booth as well and one problem I see with simply sucking on the booth's atmosphere with shop vac is that the negative air pressure will undoubtedly draw in unfiltered air through all the cracks in your booth possibly degrading your quality of finish. An answer I'd thought of was to install a large filter (something like a high-end furnace filter) in the roof with a large fan forcing air through it into the booth. The fan shouldn't be strong enough to disturb the powdered surface but the total CFM of both your gun and the ceiling fan should be at least equal, if not a little more, than the CFM draw of your filtration vaccum. Make sense?

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  • non-stick
    replied
    as long as you ONLY powder coat in there, I don't see a problem with it. A blast cabinet never used for blasting doesn't know it's not being used for it's intended purpose. After all.... it's just a box I suppose. Does gasoline care if it's only going in my plymouth and not somebody else's chevy? nope... it just is what it is, right? Square box to do with what you will... blast, powder coat, cook grilled cheese in... it's all the same. Just don't mix one with the other is all. If yer gonna blast in it.... then ONLY blast. If you're going to coat in it... then only coat. If you mix the two, then almost always blast dust will be in your coating, and powder from coating will be embedded into your blasted part. Otherwise.... it's all good.

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  • 11111111
    replied
    Thanks for the info russ, I thought I was going to run into a problem with to much air movement. I found some cheap explosion proof light covers at lowes on the discounted shelf so I'm set thier. I see that rubber gaskets are what they use to build these explosion proof lights. and silicone around the holes where the wires come through. I know thier is a code and saftey is everything but I could have built my own explosion proof covers that would have been higher quality than these. jUST SOMETHING TO KEEP IN MY FOR THE DO IT YOURSELFERS OUT THIER. iT JUST NEEDS TO BE AIR TIGHT.

    Just a side note if i was going to coat a bunch of parts the same color prettyy regularly could i just use a blast cabinet and install my pc gun inside and fill it with powder just like if I was going to blast media? Seems like it would be very efficient for a high volume color and no loss of product. and no mess!

    Okay I'm ready for all the reasons I've never seen this set up.
    Jeff

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  • non-stick
    replied
    you guys need to be moving more of a volume of air through the filters. Computer fans and the like aren't gonna cut it in my humble opinion. As stated before, you have a perfectly good option in this product : http://www.caswellplating.com/aids/cyclone/bldc1500.htm (which can do double duty for your sandblaster as well. Remember the theory of no "one trick pony" in the shop) or if you just wanted a filter for powder only, a shop vac would be best. You can pick up a viable one at any reatil outlet and get the "fine" filter for under 75 bucks. Remember.... these are your lungs we're talking about here,folks. I for one wouldn't trust them to a computer fan or anything of the sort. (side note... a furnace filter won't be helping you any as the smaller particles will flow right through it, car filters are too restrictive unless the surface area is a LOT bigger. Like 20 flat car filters bigger). Like I said before.... the booth and what not, I have no problems with any variation out there. The exhaust on the booth? Wayyyy different story. I'd seriously re-consider agains make-shift fans and so forth and just go out and get the equipment that's "meant" to handle the problem first hand. Otherwise you'll learn soon enough that you'll be out buying it anyways. Not only will your parts turn out better in the long run... but all that time saved cleaning up powder from everywhere and going in a direction that may not work in the first place will be avoided. (more time to get your buddy to help you sandblast,lol). Just my humble opinion on the whole matter,guys. Take it for what it's worth, I suppose...... Russ

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  • etyrrany
    replied
    Hey Jeff,

    I know what you mean by the meth lab. My friend and I are always up to late hours walking around and outside the garage/shop in full respirators with white cover all and latex gloves talking about powder consistencies, iron phosphates, zinc chromates, flow and melt characteristics and other suff like that. One day their going to see us outside at midnight waveing around shiny parts(quenching our parts in -5 celcius) in the cold and call the cops. The next thing you know there will be a mysterious unmarked van parked outside our garage/shop.

    We're also getting quite tired of the rainbow effect we're creating in the corner of the garage. Right now our spray booth is just seperated by plastic sheets from the rest of the garage in the corner. We vacuum up the powder but some of it still stays behind. And theres also the green wooden steps but lets not go there (spilled some green powder on our inital experimental pc job) lol.

    But this is what I was thinking of a spray booth (please chime in with design corrections/suggestions):

    - A table on 4 legs about 4 feet off the ground. 4'x6' should be big enough.

    - The left, back, right walls and ceiling will be made out of that aluminum foil backed board we were talking about here.

    - The front we were thinking of making out of plexiglass on hinges. There will be a gap from the bottom of the table so you can stick the gun and your hands into the spray booth. This gap will be something like 12'' high. Sort of like a laboratory hood.

    - For air evacuation we were thinking to buy like 2 of either 4'' or 6'' sized computer fans and mount them to the ceiling with the cheapest car air filter in front of them, something like a FRAM for a K car (maybe a furnace filter). These fans would be powered by an old computer power supply.

    - For light we were thinking a flourescent lamp in a plexiglass tube all sealed off. This would be placed on the ceiling or in one of the corners in the spray booth.

    I was meaning to make a sketch for a while now, but no time, too busy powder coating.

    What do you think?

    etyrrany

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  • non-stick
    replied
    I'd really try and keep all sources of ignition away from the inside of that booth. Put the light on the outside of the booth perhaps behind you, or cut a hole in the top and replace with plexiglass and put the light on top of that. Also...... I'd invest in a shop vac to take that powder away and not the bathroom fan. Not only for sake of powder clogging up the fan or hitting the electricals of the motor, but where would the powder go if you did that? Just "away"? Away to where? If it lingers around in your shop because you just pushed it from one area to another.... EVERYTHING is going to have powder all over it. Not to mention, you're going to breathe that stuff in and so are your buddies when they keep hanging around watching what you're doing. Nope.... I truly suggest sucking it into a filtered system and disposing of it that way. Even if you just pull it away from you and outside..... your neighbors won't be too happy with you. Houses and cars will turn blues and greens, the dog will have a tint to him.... it's gonna be a mess,lol. Eventually that cop is gonna be called and I highly doubt you'll coat your way out of that one

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  • 11111111
    replied
    Can I use fluorescent drop lights in my spray booth I was thinking of just zip tying it to the wall? Really what I want to know is their a need for explosion proofing anything? I bought a very small bathroom fan to install in the booth and am building a deflector so as not to suck the powder off the part, but to help move it out of the booth ( very little air movement but it should get the job done)
    Any other ideas that anyone can think of.
    P.s. the old people next door I'm sure think I have set up a meth lab by now. I'm up at all hours of the night with respirators and goggles on and lots of new equipment? Shouldn't be long before I get a visit from Barney Fife. My friends are just tripping over each other to come up and try out the system when I get it up and running in the next few days. Then will be able to start cooking our product and all the late night foot traffic should be just a bit more than these nosey old people can handle. They'll either move or call in the feds and report me as the suspicious quite neighbor guy that never bothers anyone but seems to be moving a lot of powder in and out of the garage.
    Maybe I'll cut the cop in on the action ( who doesn't have something they need coated) Don't they coat donuts?
    Jeff

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  • 11111111
    replied
    Thanks for the info, I think I'll build a booth out of this stuff as well.

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  • drfjr1976
    replied
    I can't think of what it is called, it's on the tip of my tongue. I think it was called something like Thermax insulation boards.

    No, it's a 4'x8' sheet about a 1/2 inch thick, has a reflective layer on one side and a black layer on the other side. You should be able to find it at just about any Home depot or Lowes.

    I just built a frame like you would for any wall and put these sheets on with reflective side facing in of the 8'x8' booth. The reflective foil layer does a great job of lighting up the booth and I have it all grounded together. Majority of all the overspray sticks to the walls and makes it pretty easy to clean up.

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  • 11111111
    replied
    drfjr1976 You lost me on the material you use for a booth. are you talking about a role of insulation and you just pulled the insulating glass off it? do you have pict you could send me.
    [email protected]

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  • non-stick
    replied
    any ground is sufficient ground. Bare piece of wire leading to an actual grounding-rod is a good example. I suppose the ground to your machine is also a good idea assuming you know for a FACT that it's grounded in the plug all the way to your electical box. It's all the same otherwise. Ground to the system, ground to earth, ground between part and sacrificial metal in the booth. As long as you get something to take stray electron flow away it's fine.

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  • 11111111
    replied
    So this piece of metal in the booth should be hooked to the grounding strap of the gun that goes to the part as welll? and if this is correct should I just add a piece of wire with a alligator clip to clamp that hooks to the part being powder coated.
    Jeff

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