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Preferred method of powdering... Hot or cold

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  • Preferred method of powdering... Hot or cold

    Still being very new to this I'm trying to understand the different processes and all my current tests have been to powder the item cold, then start timing when the powder changes state, however, a colleague says the best method is to heat up the item to 180 and then shoot the powder? What's the consensus of opinion including any pro's and con's for each method?
    Cheers
    Ian

  • #2
    i prefer shooting cold , but the way you cure your parts is wrong.. you must start the timing when the part reaches cure temp and for that you need to use an infrared thermometer
    http://www.peintureenpoudrepb.com
    http://www.polissagepb.com
    http://www.powdercoatpb.com
    baz

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    • #3
      I'll do a plus one on baz's post. Thing is, if you heat up a 20" rim to 180, by the time you remove it and coat it, it may still be in the 150 range or lower... but if you heat up a stainless steel electrical outlet plate and hang it to shoot, it will likely be in the 100 degree range much faster... so the heating thing doesn't make sense, as you would have to know the cooling rate and heat stability and a bunch of other calculus and physics and astrophysics kind of math to even get close to knowing what temp it was over the most of your coating procedure ... aside from all that, Ambient temp can be measured fairly accurately every time, and then put the parts in a preheated oven, as baz stated, use an IR thermometer to verify the PART has reached temp, not the oven, and no visual indicators will tell you that.

      You can "pre-measure" the time it takes to get the part to temp, by putting it in the oven to see how long it takes to reach temp if you like... on items I am unfamiliar with, I do that.

      On another note - if the powder is not attracting to your parts cold, you have other issues you need to address. Grounding or gun controls or even gun failure...
      Last edited by SCOTTRODS; 05-09-2016, 11:19 AM.
      EMAIL scottrodspc@gmail.com

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      • #4
        From what I understand, if you want to powder coat something that is not conductive ( even wood or glass ) the only way to get the powder to stick is to get the item close to the flow out temp of the powder and then shoot it. However, for most metal items, it's better to shoot the item cold, put it in the oven and wait till the powder starts to flow out. Then start the timer for the correct cure time. <br />
        <br />
        Does anyone disagree?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by ershler View Post
          From what I understand, if you want to powder coat something that is not conductive ( even wood or glass ) the only way to get the powder to stick is to get the item close to the flow out temp of the powder and then shoot it. However, for most metal items, it's better to shoot the item cold, put it in the oven and wait till the powder starts to flow out. Then start the timer for the correct cure time. <br />
          <br />
          Does anyone disagree?

          Yes. Generally, I can shoot anything from wood to glass, to plastic and more without any heat. I have been able to since the Hypersmooth days. I still use an Eastwood Pro1100 gun as well, and it will put powder on glass without heating it. This can be an environmental issue as well as a gun capability issue. But over all, it shouldn't be "necessary" to heat an object to put powder on it with a lot of guns out there. There are always going to be exceptions, but the standard is not to heat stuff up. The standard will still be to coat cold if possible, then do what it takes above and beyond that if necessary.
          EMAIL scottrodspc@gmail.com

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          • #6
            well i prefer cold coating and focusing on the moisture when applying the coat and curing process, cold coating metals is the best way (i run everything on a convoyer and use a corona gun Gema Optiflex 2) also got 2 optiflex automatic with a total of 8 guns ( 4 on ea side) there should be no need to heat the object befor coating it,

            may i ask what kind of gun you use and is it tribo or corona?

            also preheating the object befor coating will but a big dent in ur efficeny (deppending on ur set up ofc)

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            • #7
              Originally posted by gyogo View Post
              well i prefer cold coating and focusing on the moisture when applying the coat and curing process, cold coating metals is the best way (i run everything on a convoyer and use a corona gun Gema Optiflex 2) also got 2 optiflex automatic with a total of 8 guns ( 4 on ea side) there should be no need to heat the object befor coating it,

              may i ask what kind of gun you use and is it tribo or corona?

              also preheating the object befor coating will but a big dent in ur efficeny (deppending on ur set up ofc)
              Not to be argumentative so much as to point out the reality... people who are doing line coating such as yourself, are not what most of the questions and answers are geared toward. Efficiency is rarely a concern when custom coating.

              I agree with your assessment in a commercial coating situation where every penny is counted and recounted to make money.

              The original poster and the replies have all considered the guy is working out of his garage doing this as a hobby biz...

              On custom coating, the objective is to provide a service that, in fact, costs more time. We also charge a lot more per part, than a coater doing large contracts. It's a trade off of sorts, you do harder work per part coated, you do a lot less of them, so you charge a ton more as well, because of the fact you have to consider your costs being higher, taking more time to prep and finish parts, and a VERY custom, "Only mine looks like this" bragging right for each very different customer.
              EMAIL scottrodspc@gmail.com

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by SCOTTRODS View Post
                Not to be argumentative so much as to point out the reality... people who are doing line coating such as yourself, are not what most of the questions and answers are geared toward. Efficiency is rarely a concern when custom coating.
                I agree with your assessment in a commercial coating situation where every penny is counted and recounted to make money.
                The original poster and the replies have all considered the guy is working out of his garage doing this as a hobby biz...
                On custom coating, the objective is to provide a service that, in fact, costs more time. We also charge a lot more per part, than a coater doing large contracts. It's a trade off of sorts, you do harder work per part coated, you do a lot less of them, so you charge a ton more as well, because of the fact you have to consider your costs being higher, taking more time to prep and finish parts, and a VERY custom, "Only mine looks like this" bragging right for each very different customer.
                Yeah, i do understand i mostly coat our own product "Tele Cabinets" but i do alot of side work aswell for private people and side companies such as off-shore parts/Car parts and many things alike but still main production goes towards our own company, so efficeny is still a big thing.

                i got a quite alot of different clear coats/chrome coats just for rims/callipers etc for the regular car/bike enthusiast

                i got a dedicated tribo gun for chrome coats and do quite alot of customized work i can show some examples on wensday when i get back to work of the samples i made to show our options with mixed/metallic/chrome/reflex/clear coats

                also sorry for going off-topic

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by ershler View Post
                  From what I understand, if you want to powder coat something that is not conductive ( even wood or glass ) the only way to get the powder to stick is to get the item close to the flow out temp of the powder and then shoot it. However, for most metal items, it's better to shoot the item cold, put it in the oven and wait till the powder starts to flow out. Then start the timer for the correct cure time. <br />
                  <br />
                  Does anyone disagree?

                  i partly disagree about starting the cure time at flow out . if you are using the manufacturer s cure parameter then it should start at part temp not at flow out.
                  on thin metal not a huge difference but on heavier or thicker material there is a big difference .
                  http://www.peintureenpoudrepb.com
                  http://www.polissagepb.com
                  http://www.powdercoatpb.com
                  baz

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by gyogo View Post

                    i got a dedicated tribo gun for chrome coats and do quite alot of customized work i can show some examples on wensday when i get back to work of the samples i made to show our options with mixed/metallic/chrome/reflex/clear coats

                    also sorry for going off-topic
                    Hi Gyogo
                    if you don' mind me asking, what tribo gun do you use? I' currently using an older Colo 610 fluidising hopper system but I'm due the new Colo 191s in a couple of days....

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