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Newbie for powdercoating firearms

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  • Newbie for powdercoating firearms

    Great board!

    I have been molycoating military firearms for a few years and would like to upgrade to using powder coatings. I have experimented with a "brand x" powder coat gun and coating small parts and curing in a toaster oven. I am very pleased with this testing and need some advice to step up to bigger parts.

    From reading it appears that should DEFINITELY use an oven over IR due to all the angles on a gun that would not get direct IR contact. Any comments?

    Powder types? What do you suggest? Do all powder types have similiar flow and glassy surface (no orange peel).

    High temp powders. How do these hold up?

    Any help suggestions are very appreciated!

    Thanks for a great board!!

    Darin Reiss
    DR Manufacturing

  • #2
    Darin.....

    Welcome to the board! We're glad you've decided to join our little "family". I hope you have as much fun here as I do on a regular basis and enjoy yourself as I have.

    As for your oven needs.... that is totally up to you. From experience I can tell you that yes, a "chamber" type oven with indirect heat would suit your needs best. I think you're on the right track of thinking when you consider all of the nuances involved with a firearm. As for powder types that I would suggest, TGIC appears to be best suited for you. Good flow characteristic and durability. Of course, epoxy (for durability) and polyesters (for aesthetic) are no slouches either! I suppose it all depends on your intended purpose as to which "flavor" of formulation you'll be needing. Not all situations are created equal, nor are all powders. The epoxy *tends* to have a slight mottle or orange peel to it when you hit the heavily pigmented tones. What this powder lacks in aesthetics, it certainly makes up for in durability though. However.... it's regarded as an indoor powder due to it's inability to resist UV rays. Polyester has great flow characteristices and UV resistance but for abrasion...... not as good as the epoxy. This is where TGIC and hybrids come into play. Think of them as the combination of the two. You may find not as many colours available in a TGIC, but there's more available than a standard epoxy. Of course, you gain the durability factor of the epoxy yet add the values and flow characteristics of the polyester. I do believe you will find these to be your best choice out there.

    As for the higher temperature coatings, they do very well. A totally different formulation alltogether. These powders have a silicone base to them and withstand great amounts of heat for an extended duration. Again... when you "add" a form or function to a powder, you lose in another area. Limited colours available to date in the industry, but what you do have performs very well.

    Just as an "on the fly" suggestion... I suggest these products for you (although I don't know if your needs for colour or function vary). :

    http://www.caswellplating.com/powder...r_colors2.html
    on this page :

    PCP92992 ~ reflectra TGIC
    PCP32991 ~ Mercedes Silver Urethane
    PCP9970381 ~ burner black High-Temp silicone base
    PCP10641 ~ matte black epoxy

    I see these as being of use to you in coating firearms (unless somebody wants a shocking pink Dirty Harry 44 Magnum for some reason ). They have been used with great success here by quite a few people and I have no doubt you'll get the same stunning results (have you seen the photo album located by the link up at the top of every page?). I know I speak on behalf of everybody here when I say "welcome aboard and enjoy your time with us". Hope that helps...... Russ

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks!!

      Russ,
      Thanks for the information! This will help a lot.
      Thanks,
      Darin

      Comment


      • #4
        Darin.... we want pictures when you're finished. I don't mind telling you that we're photo-hounds here and love to see each other's work When it's all done, post em in the "album" and brag a bit,k? Thanx!.... Russ

        Comment


        • #5
          I already see I need a bigger oven!

          OK, I was experimenting with a toaster oven. Fine for little parts but I need a bigger oven.

          I was given an extra kitchen oven by a friend last night and I can only get about 27"of working width.

          I need something wider! 40 some inches of width would be ideal. I am trying to figure out the best way to build it. So far I am planning on 18 gauge internal steel and a 1.5" angle iron frame. Not sure what to use for insulation or door hinges. Many questions left to answer. Any suggestions are appreciated.

          Thanks,
          Darin

          Comment


          • #6
            I already see I need a bigger oven!

            OK, I was experimenting with a toaster oven. Fine for little parts but I need a bigger oven.

            I was given an extra kitchen oven by a friend last night and I can only get about 27"of working width.

            I need something wider! 40 some inches of width would be ideal. I am trying to figure out the best way to build it. So far I am planning on 18 gauge internal steel and a 1.5" angle iron frame. Not sure what to use for insulation or door hinges. Many questions left to answer. Any suggestions are appreciated.

            Thanks,
            Darin

            Comment

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