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Lamps-Like heating a house with the doors & windows open

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  • Lamps-Like heating a house with the doors & windows open

    I'm getting no end of people phoning up asking why they can't get their lamps to heat the parts up to the powder melt temp.

    I've tried to explain that they wouldn't try to heat their house with all the doors and windows open, yet they try to do the same thing with a lamp.

    The problem needs:
    1. heat containment
    2. Consideration of the total surface are (heat collecting area) available
    3. Reflectors
    etc

    If anyone has any bright ideas, this is the place to put them!!!!

    Thanks

    (frustrated Mike)
    --
    Mike Caswell
    Caswell Inc
    http://www.caswellplating.com
    Need Support? Visit our online support section at http://support.caswellplating.com

  • #2
    Well, when I used the IR light, I had to do different tactics then the instructions show. First off, like Caswell has said, it has to be done in a area that is "closed" such as indoors with windows and doors closed. Another thing is this, if the part is cold, like a 30 degree day, than it is going to take longer to heat up. Another consideration is the part size or density.

    A large surface area and thin material will pull the heat away from the area being heated by the lamp. You will have to move the lamp closer then the recommended distances specify in the instructions.

    A large, heavy casting will pull heat away from the area as well, but once the piece gets heated up it actually will melt the powder really well and be easier to control the temperature.

    When I say placing the lamp closer to the workpiece I mean like having the light only 2" or so from the part, unlike the instructions say. The best thing to do is coat a junk piece, or even a few different junk pieces of varying material, like maybe a thin piece of sheetmetal and a heavy cast iron castin. This will be two different extremes and show you big heating requirement differences.

    The IR lamps sold for hobby use may not be the easiest part to use, but it allows many people to do larger parts at a cheaper cost. It just takes more work to do it, you have to monitor the part closely compared to a large oven.

    I suggest this, with the two metal examples I specified above, KEEP A LOGBOOK OF YOUR PROGRESS!!!! Try things the book does not say, what are ya gonna do Hurt a junk part? Who cares, you learn by screwing up stuff lol

    In the logbook, write the type of piece you are coating, maybe even some sizes or weights, if you wish. Place the lamp next to the piece, record the distance of the lamp, check the temp in 5 mins, check again in 3 mins, if the temp is still rising, leave it there and check again every 3 mins. Once the temp stabilizes, either move the light closer or further away according to your desired temperature. Keep writing the temp every 3 mins, this way you know about when to expect the temp to be at a certain point at a certain distance. You have something to refer to for future pieces.

    Again, as I said, you may have to move the lamp closer to the piece than the instructions tell you to do. So...if you do, record the distance as well.

    Another thing, when taking the temp, what are you guys using? A IR temp gun?? That would be the only thing I would use for this. Another thing, when you shoot the part with the gun, make sure you aren't getting a reflection of the light elements themselves for you reading, some colors such as black will give yo a false reading at times, depending on the angle you shoot the part.

    Comment


    • #3
      If you are trying to cure odly shaped parts you might run into trouble using a curing lamp. IR waves move in a straight line, this may leave curved or angled parts uncured or undercured. You might have to keep moving the lamp at different angles to properly cure a part. If you have any doubt at all, get behind it and aim it like a gun. Curing lamps work great "line of sight" but you might need to do things like make some brackets to aim it properly. Correct me if I'm wrong, but most powders allow for up to 100% overcure, so if you move it slowly chances are that you won't hurt the coating. Also trying some reflective materials like aluminum sheet (polished) in different shapes might help. You can pick it up at any Lowes or Home Depot, and it's easy to cut and bend to different shapes. There is no be all end all method for IR curing odly shaped parts...experimentation and evaluation is the key. Good luck to all who use IR to cure. If you come up with a successful method please share it with the rest of us.

      Comment


      • #4
        building an oven or reflectors..

        Hey there i finally coated one of my valve covers and got it to cure.. I need to know how to contain the heat with reflectors of aluminum without covering the top of the heat lamp. That causes it to cover up the vent holes in the lamp and will over heat it. Anyone have any bright ideas how to build a small heat box and also let the lamp breathe thanks. Dave.

        Comment


        • #5
          Don't put the shielding around the light, put it around the part (valve cover), and point the light into it. Home Depot or Menards will have rolls of sheet aluminum that you can cut and bend to shape for your heat retainer/reflector. Put it on a concrete floor (or other fireproof base), and make it look like a box with one side open for the lamp to point in. That will hold the heat around the part and not let it radiate off into space.

          For parts like valve covers and oil pans, I have also used a heat gun on the *inside* of the part (where there is no powder) to assist the light in curing nooks and crannies. Light pointing at the outside of the part, heat gun pointing at the inside of the part. You can watch the powder cure as you move them around. If you try this in the winter in a cold garage, it won't work.

          Hemi-T

          Comment


          • #6
            the foil type car windsheild sun deflector things that are mutlifold will stand themselves up and are thicker than aluminum foil. Some of them are also thicker or insulated.

            Let me know if anyone has used this one.
            Matt
            Texas Coater

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Lamps-Like heating a house with the doors & windows open

              for the price of the IR lights you might be better off investing the money into materials for a home built oven

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Lamps-Like heating a house with the doors & windows open

                Originally posted by mcaswell View Post
                I'm getting no end of people phoning up asking why they can't get their lamps to heat the parts up to the powder melt temp.

                I've tried to explain that they wouldn't try to heat their house with all the doors and windows open, yet they try to do the same thing with a lamp.

                The problem needs:
                1. heat containment
                2. Consideration of the total surface are (heat collecting area) available
                3. Reflectors
                etc

                If anyone has any bright ideas, this is the place to put them!!!!

                Thanks

                (frustrated Mike)
                Here's my bright idea. I bought one of your Pro setups with the IR lamp. Try making it clear in the sales material that the IR lamp isn't going to work and eliminate all those calls. I've tried reflectors, enclosures, etc. and mine won't get within 125 degrees of curing temperature. Consulting the forums only confirmed that they don't work as a stand-alone solution, yet you sell them that way.

                (frustrated John)

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Lamps-Like heating a house with the doors & windows open

                  I guess that means you can't cure PC outside then, right?

                  I just started to look about powder coating last night so don't call me dumb

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Lamps-Like heating a house with the doors & windows open

                    Originally posted by manco12 View Post
                    I guess that means you can't cure PC outside then, right?

                    I just started to look about powder coating last night so don't call me dumb
                    The biggest problem with curing outside, would be contamination of the part during cure. You can accidentally cure powder in the sun,.... someone on one forum recently was upset because they had powder over spray on their motorcycle seat and pushed it outside in the sun, and it stuck and partially cured just from the sun and the black seat fabric/leather.... ruined the seat as far as we know.... no follow-up was done.
                    sigpic

                    See photos of my work on Facebook "Scottrods Powder Coating"

                    EMAIL scottrodspc@gmail.com

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Lamps-Like heating a house with the doors & windows open

                      I want to powder coat my dune buggy frame. I just don't have a big enough garage though. The buggy fits in there with everything else leaving no room left. Could I use an infared heat lamp to cure powder coat outside? Would it be able to get hot enough? I can't find anything on this subject except this thread which tells me that I can't powder coat outside?

                      Thanks

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Lamps-Like heating a house with the doors & windows open

                        Originally posted by manco12 View Post
                        I want to powder coat my dune buggy frame. I just don't have a big enough garage though. The buggy fits in there with everything else leaving no room left. Could I use an infared heat lamp to cure powder coat outside? Would it be able to get hot enough? I can't find anything on this subject except this thread which tells me that I can't powder coat outside?

                        Thanks
                        Once again, outdoors is not a great idea. However,.... if you can create a temporary enclosure to house the Dune Buggy frame I see no reason why you couldn't do this project. Build you a frame large enough for you and the IR lamp/s and the frame, and cover it with thick mill drop cloth plastic to give yourself a "wind resistant place to work,.... It's likely you may still get stuff in the coating finish in an unprotected environment, this should minimize that. It's gonna get hot in the "tent" so make sure you don't over do it on yourself,..... and give it SOME ventilation. Anything is possible for some energy or money... maybe even some time.

                        The hardest part about this project will still be preparation of the frame, for coating, without giving it time to rust...... I may do something similar to get my Dune Buggy Frame coated.... Mine is a "manx Style" dune buggy.... Yours?
                        sigpic

                        See photos of my work on Facebook "Scottrods Powder Coating"

                        EMAIL scottrodspc@gmail.com

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Lamps-Like heating a house with the doors & windows open

                          Mine is more of a big go-kart type thing. I'm working on it and then I want to build my own later. The 12hp engine on my 750 pound buggy only pulls it around 30 mph

                          So I want to powder coat my current buggy now

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Lamps-Like heating a house with the doors & windows open

                            Originally posted by manco12 View Post
                            Mine is more of a big go-kart type thing. I'm working on it and then I want to build my own later. The 12hp engine on my 750 pound buggy only pulls it around 30 mph

                            So I want to powder coat my current buggy now
                            LOL,... Patience is killing you huh?

                            All that is above, still applies. Hopefully you can do the job and share some pictures and results with the forum.
                            sigpic

                            See photos of my work on Facebook "Scottrods Powder Coating"

                            EMAIL scottrodspc@gmail.com

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Lamps-Like heating a house with the doors & windows open

                              Depending on the cost to do this, I might save up for a decent size shed

                              Comment

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