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P/C over Chrome

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  • P/C over Chrome

    I am a complete newbie on PC. But I would like to check out the possibilities of P/C'ing drum hardware (like hoops, lugs, etc). This is for the musical instruments and not other types of drums.

    I have read several posts and I'm not sure of the best answer. All of the drum hardware is chrome (usually) over steel and I'm not sure what the best surface prep should be. I've seen that you can P/C right over chrome as long as it's in good condition and I've seen that it must be sandblasted or chemically stripped.

    My question: What way will work and how do I do it?

  • #2
    I have PC's a few Chrome Plated parts (<shameless plug> Look in the album at the Yellow Air Cleaner) http://www.caswellplating.com/bbs/al...php?pic_id=168

    All I have done is clean it real well and shot. I have had no problems other then Self-induced chrome is so hard and is bonded to the item well enough that you do not need to strip it. Now If I am wrong, I am sure I will be corrected

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    • #3
      Suggestion...

      I know plating won't stick to chrome, not sure about powdercoating but here's how to get rid of the chrome layer. You could try soaking the parts in a solution of 2 parts distilled water and 1 part muratic acid (see pool cleaner soultions at the local WalMart or hardware chain store) for a few minutes, until the blueish haze stops coming off the parts (that's the chrome seperating). Remember, the silver color underneath is Nickel, NOT chrome, and that can stay. All you need is to get the blueish haze off the part. That's the chrome itself. Then rinse the part WELL in clean water with a little baking soda added to neutralize the acid, then rinse again in pure distilled water. Then prep as normally required for powdercoating, and that should eliminate the chrome.

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      • #4
        Thanks for your input. I really appreciate it. What are your opinions about durability? My example is regarding the hoops. Frequently, the drumstick comes in contact with hoop and quite hard. Should I add a clearcoat over the color P/C or would the color coat stand up to the abuse?

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        • #5
          Dan, I p/c over chrome all the time. It isnt the best way to do it, but it can be done. Things to look out for are, quality of chrome, (age of chrome) type of metal under chrome. For example, it you try to do a die cast rim, you are asking for a lot of problems & here is why. In diecast there tends to be pits in the metal that hold gas & when heated it "outgasses" causing the chrome to bubble.

          I just did a set of diecast rims that were brand new that gassed, talk about frustrating. If you have to absolutely pc over cast rims, then heat the oven like at 250 degrees. I did mine at 350 & it bubbled, but the one rim that was near the top of the oven, fartherest from the heating element didnt bubble as bad, so that is why I recommend a lower temp.

          The only other way to really do it rite, would be to strip the chrome then heat the diecast & while hot shoot it with powder. This will keep the outgassing minimal, as it will already be outgasses.

          I tend to use the translucents over chrome as they look so good when done.

          I have a snare that is transblue over chrome & I do nothing but rim shots & it is holding up really well. I wouldnt recommend clearcoating the final finish, I just dont think its neccessary.

          Hope that helps...
          Cole Regal
          Regal Metal Works

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          • #6
            Re: Suggestion...

            Originally posted by dagobert
            I know plating won't stick to chrome, not sure about powdercoating but here's how to get rid of the chrome layer. You could try soaking the parts in a solution of 2 parts distilled water and 1 part muratic acid (see pool cleaner soultions at the local WalMart or hardware chain store) for a few minutes, until the blueish haze stops coming off the parts (that's the chrome seperating). Remember, the silver color underneath is Nickel, NOT chrome, and that can stay. All you need is to get the blueish haze off the part. That's the chrome itself. Then rinse the part WELL in clean water with a little baking soda added to neutralize the acid, then rinse again in pure distilled water. Then prep as normally required for powdercoating, and that should eliminate the chrome.
            Beats sanding which is what I have been doing.. UGH Where were ya 2 weeks ago! lol....

            Archer
            I Plead the Fifth!

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            • #7
              Trickle,

              Do you use a chemical stripping process or sandblast for your diecast hoops? Also, have you ever tried to P/C over brass hoops/hardware?

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