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Getting Into Powdercoating and Need Some Help ... Please

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  • Getting Into Powdercoating and Need Some Help ... Please

    I am want to bite the bullet and get into powdercoating, and I need some advice. I have acutally done quite a bit of auto "painting", but have never got into the powder. Essentially, my first project will be coating aluminum motorcycle parts (wheels, controls, etc.). I want a matte-finished silver look - not much gloss or sheen. What do I need to get started? What do I need besides the gun, powder, charger, and oven? I already have a cheapie sandblaster and a spray booth from painting, so I think I am set there. Also, where is a good resource for powders? I am just very wet behind the ears here, so any and all advice to a newbie would be appreciated. Thanks in advance.

  • #2
    Caswell sells powder here on the site. As far as you needing anything other than what you already listed, you should be good to go. Alot of us here use coat hangers to hang the parts and such. You may want to get you some Hi-temp tape and few silicone plugs to start with too. Dont go crazy buying those things has it will last probably longer than you would excpect. If I left something out, i am sure some one else will jump in.

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    • #3
      You might also want to get an IR temp.gun so you can monitor the temp. of the parts.

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      • #4
        Benny we all start out wet behind the ears and what you find is after getting started the wet turns to sweat and moves from the ears to the forehead.Sounds like you've gotten a good grasp on what is needed and my only suggestion is start small. Grab some scrap, order your stuff and welcome to the addiction.

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        • #5
          dale: we all start out wet behind the ears heck i am still wet behind my ear's heheheh

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          • #6
            Thanks for the advice all. Can anyone tell me the difference between a "good" PC gun and a run of the mill unit? I have seen them cost anywhere from $100 - $1,500. I don't want to spend a fortune, but I don't want the quality of my work to suffer either. Thanks again. Any more help would be appreciated.

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            • #7
              Benny, I do port lites and hatches that go on everything from multi million $$ yachts to Coast guard cutters and I use the so called hobbie gun..granted you get more control with the big $$ guns but I believe the final finish is the results of the operator more than anything else..I suggest to go with the hobbie for the time being, you never know...you may decide you dont want to get into powder coating after awhile...sorta unimaginable but possible i guess....good luck...
              Pro-Tech Powder Coating
              93976 Ocean Way
              541-247-8168
              [email protected]
              Gold Beach,Oregon

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              • #8
                My 2 cents worth

                Originally posted by Benny10
                Thanks for the advice all. Can anyone tell me the difference between a "good" PC gun and a run of the mill unit? I have seen them cost anywhere from $100 - $1,500. I don't want to spend a fortune, but I don't want the quality of my work to suffer either. Thanks again. Any more help would be appreciated.
                Benny10, might I suggest approaching it this way: Ask yourself, do I understand and have enough experience to really utilize all the adjustability and complexity of one of those $1,500 "pro" units? Honestly, not likely would anyone just starting out. So better to stick to the "hobby" gun at first, and master the basic techniques, then learn all you can do with it. I think you'll find that the majority of projects most people take on (especially at first) are well within its capabilities, and quite honestly, a LOT of the quality of the finish is just like in painting- it's a result of a lot of detailed prep work and using quality powder products, plus in knowing what to do to get a jump on the learning curve.

                And that's where Caswells comes into it- yes, there are a number of "hobby" units on the market. BUT, what you'll find is that the gun itself is only a small part of it. The thing that sets Caswells apart (from my experience) is the fact that they are there AFTER the sale, to provide technical support and guidence on HOW to get the final results you want, and they also sell the quality of powders and supplies that you need to be able to do nice work. There's still a learning curve, as there is with anything, but the little extra that you might spend on the front end by buying the gun and powders from Caswells is an investment in making sure that you end up with a functioning hobby, and not just a toy that sits on the shelf because you never could get it to work right.

                That's my experience, and I've been exactly where you are now (as have most of us here on the forum), so the only other thing I can suggest is to ask questions here- a lot of them- and to go back and read the previous posts. There's FAR more in here to learn than in any manual I've seen yet on the intricacies of the subject. Welcome to the board.

                Jay

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                • #9
                  i have tryed a few hobby gun's and i had a pro gun til i got flooded .. most the time i used a hobby gun and still got great looking parts .. if you are just starting what every one is saying is right

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                  • #10
                    Thanks all. I just received my Caswell basic gun kit earlier this week. It looks sweet, and I cannot wait to start coating. I will be back to ask plenty of more questions.

                    Benny

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