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  • #16
    I have five diff ovens in my shop, two are normal ovens the one being a self cleaning oven that i use for reg stuff plus burnin off my hooks on the clean cycle, my good ol toaster oven for doing nuts and bolts, my converted commercial coke a cola cooler and my propane heated converted home oven.....they might not be fancy lookin......but they work and they pay the bills.....
    Pro-Tech Powder Coating
    93976 Ocean Way
    541-247-8168
    [email protected]
    Gold Beach,Oregon

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    • #17
      wattage question

      I am currently building an oven based on viper56's design 3x3x4, now i'm thinking that it might be to small. I want to increase it to 3x6x4 do you think my two 3100 watt elements will be able to get the temp up to 450? if not whats the biggest size i can go with my 2 3100 watt elements?

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      • #18
        with minimal insulation temp is not a problem the bigger units just take longer to reach temp and cycle time on the element is longer. shold work fine. besides thirty amps is a good place to keep the wiring at your house handles that with know problem. the oven is on a 50amp but most everything else is 30amp. and there is room to be above that just be sane.
        Thier are only two real sports!
        boxing and auto racing
        all the rest are just games.

        Drive it like you stole it!

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        • #19
          Originally posted by 11111111
          with minimal insulation temp is not a problem the bigger units just take longer to reach temp and cycle time on the element is longer. shold work fine. besides thirty amps is a good place to keep the wiring at your house handles that with know problem. the oven is on a 50amp but most everything else is 30amp. and there is room to be above that just be sane.
          Did you get my email?

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          • #20
            thanks 111111

            thanks, i have a friend int he hvac industry so i got free sheet metal and some heavy duty industrial oven insulation hopefully that will help. I'm using a 220v on a 60 amp breaker that powers my tig welder so power shouldnt be a problem.

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            • #21
              Hi all,

              Just flew back in last night and catching up on all of the posts. If you chose to use metal stud construction, make sure that you overlap the panels as shown on my website. It makes for a very sturdy design. Also for those of you who are looking for a low cost of cutting metal panels, Harbor Freight has electric metal shears for $29.00 which work great.

              Jim

              Oven Construction:

              http://www.stivermotorsports.com/id44.htm

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              • #22
                Re: Cooking up an oven project

                Thanks Tinbender:
                I am also somewhat concerned about the wood base & that's why I planned to cover it first with "Hardy Board" & then with 18 gauge sheet metal. At first, I planned to build the floor base out of the metal studs & tracks from Home depot, but thought once topped with only 18 gauge sheet metal, I would get a lot of sagging of the floor between each 16" stud? I do plan to both walk into the oven & many times roll a somewhat heavy product into the oven. Is 18 gauge sheet heavy enough to support the weight with out sagging between the studs supporting it?
                Bob
                www.capecodpowdercoating.com

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                • #23
                  Re: Cooking up a oven design

                  Hey Chicago:
                  FYI: A 3100 watt heating element wired to 220v will draw 12.9 amps per element. So if you plan to provide 30 amps, you can only use 2 elements, move up to 50 amps & 3 will be fine!
                  Good Luck!
                  Bob
                  www.capecodpowdercoating.com

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                  • #24
                    Bob
                    I have 20 gauge sheeting on my floor with 16 gauge framing. I put 8# density mineral wool insulation in the floor to make it a little more rigid. I plan on putting 2 U-channel tracks, possibly from some 10 gauge I have, to roll racks on. The floor panels move a little when I walk on it but not bad - but I only weigh about 150. I think the 18 gauge with 16" OC framing and a fairly ridgid insulation would be fine. Is this Handy Board you are talking about that cement boardunderlayment material. If it is, if you put it under your floor sheeting you could probably go to a little lighter gauge metal.
                    www.tinmans.net
                    "Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -- WOW--What a Ride!!!" ----- Unknown

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                    • #25
                      Re: Cooking up a oven project

                      Hey Tinbender:
                      Well that is what I want to hear. Sounds like if I frame the floor with the 20 gauge steel studs & tracks (16 OC) and then insulate the open bays, apply the "Hardy Board" (yes this is the concrete type uderlayment for tile), then top with 18 gauge sheet metal, it would be fine (no sag in between the studs)?
                      I plan to still use the 18 gauge, as I weigh just under twice your wieght!
                      Sound doable?
                      Thanks
                      Bob
                      www.capecodpowdercoating.com

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                      • #26
                        Bob, I think that plan will work fine. If you feel you need more reinforcement after you get the floor in, just bend some U shaped channels from 16 gauge and make a pair of tracks from the door to the back of the oven to roll your racks in - this will also make them go in and out straight. I posted a few pictures of how my oven looks so far. I hope to hook the heat source up to it one evening this coming week.

                        Leo
                        www.tinmans.net
                        "Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -- WOW--What a Ride!!!" ----- Unknown

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                        • #27
                          tinbender what you charge to build a oven like the one you posted pics of. Nice work.

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                          • #28
                            I haven't really thought about selling them. This one was just an experiment . I imagine the freight would eat you up on it - it's pretty heavy.
                            www.tinmans.net
                            "Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -- WOW--What a Ride!!!" ----- Unknown

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by tinbender722
                              I haven't really thought about selling them. This one was just an experiment . I imagine the freight would eat you up on it - it's pretty heavy.
                              Road trip would not be a problem.

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                              • #30
                                i have picked up enough info on this site to build my own oven. i am using the metal studs and sheet metal 4'x4' 6'. my question is what are the methods that everyone uses to load and hang larger items like a motorcycle frame.

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