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Cooking up an oven project...

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  • hjeades
    replied
    Re: Cooking up an oven project...

    Originally posted by viper56 View Post
    Hi all,

    Just flew back in last night and catching up on all of the posts. If you chose to use metal stud construction, make sure that you overlap the panels as shown on my website. It makes for a very sturdy design. Also for those of you who are looking for a low cost of cutting metal panels, Harbor Freight has electric metal shears for $29.00 which work great.

    Jim

    Oven Construction:

    stivermotorsports.com
    I clicked on your web address and when the site opens I click where it says powder coating oven plans and all I get is sponsor links. I am doing something wrong?

    Harley

    Leave a comment:


  • corybarta
    replied
    I have dissected an oven and am building a bigger one. I want to extend the wires from the control knob to the burners. Do I need to use the same type of wire that says 125 degree celcius on it or will wire of the same gauge work. like automotive wire thanks

    Leave a comment:


  • kchotboat
    replied
    Originally posted by tinbender722
    kchotboat

    Let me do some figuring and see where my cost is and I will get back with you,

    Leo
    Sounds good. Pm me your number or email [email protected]

    Leave a comment:


  • tinbender722
    replied
    kchotboat

    Let me do some figuring and see where my cost is and I will get back with you,

    Leo

    Leave a comment:


  • mike82
    replied
    i have picked up enough info on this site to build my own oven. i am using the metal studs and sheet metal 4'x4' 6'. my question is what are the methods that everyone uses to load and hang larger items like a motorcycle frame.

    Leave a comment:


  • kchotboat
    replied
    Originally posted by tinbender722
    I haven't really thought about selling them. This one was just an experiment . I imagine the freight would eat you up on it - it's pretty heavy.
    Road trip would not be a problem.

    Leave a comment:


  • tinbender722
    replied
    I haven't really thought about selling them. This one was just an experiment . I imagine the freight would eat you up on it - it's pretty heavy.

    Leave a comment:


  • kchotboat
    replied
    tinbender what you charge to build a oven like the one you posted pics of. Nice work.

    Leave a comment:


  • tinbender722
    replied
    Bob, I think that plan will work fine. If you feel you need more reinforcement after you get the floor in, just bend some U shaped channels from 16 gauge and make a pair of tracks from the door to the back of the oven to roll your racks in - this will also make them go in and out straight. I posted a few pictures of how my oven looks so far. I hope to hook the heat source up to it one evening this coming week.

    Leo

    Leave a comment:


  • trsick
    replied
    Re: Cooking up a oven project

    Hey Tinbender:
    Well that is what I want to hear. Sounds like if I frame the floor with the 20 gauge steel studs & tracks (16 OC) and then insulate the open bays, apply the "Hardy Board" (yes this is the concrete type uderlayment for tile), then top with 18 gauge sheet metal, it would be fine (no sag in between the studs)?
    I plan to still use the 18 gauge, as I weigh just under twice your wieght!
    Sound doable?
    Thanks
    Bob

    Leave a comment:


  • tinbender722
    replied
    Bob
    I have 20 gauge sheeting on my floor with 16 gauge framing. I put 8# density mineral wool insulation in the floor to make it a little more rigid. I plan on putting 2 U-channel tracks, possibly from some 10 gauge I have, to roll racks on. The floor panels move a little when I walk on it but not bad - but I only weigh about 150. I think the 18 gauge with 16" OC framing and a fairly ridgid insulation would be fine. Is this Handy Board you are talking about that cement boardunderlayment material. If it is, if you put it under your floor sheeting you could probably go to a little lighter gauge metal.

    Leave a comment:


  • trsick
    replied
    Re: Cooking up a oven design

    Hey Chicago:
    FYI: A 3100 watt heating element wired to 220v will draw 12.9 amps per element. So if you plan to provide 30 amps, you can only use 2 elements, move up to 50 amps & 3 will be fine!
    Good Luck!
    Bob

    Leave a comment:


  • trsick
    replied
    Re: Cooking up an oven project

    Thanks Tinbender:
    I am also somewhat concerned about the wood base & that's why I planned to cover it first with "Hardy Board" & then with 18 gauge sheet metal. At first, I planned to build the floor base out of the metal studs & tracks from Home depot, but thought once topped with only 18 gauge sheet metal, I would get a lot of sagging of the floor between each 16" stud? I do plan to both walk into the oven & many times roll a somewhat heavy product into the oven. Is 18 gauge sheet heavy enough to support the weight with out sagging between the studs supporting it?
    Bob

    Leave a comment:


  • viper56
    replied
    Hi all,

    Just flew back in last night and catching up on all of the posts. If you chose to use metal stud construction, make sure that you overlap the panels as shown on my website. It makes for a very sturdy design. Also for those of you who are looking for a low cost of cutting metal panels, Harbor Freight has electric metal shears for $29.00 which work great.

    Jim

    Oven Construction:

    http://www.stivermotorsports.com/id44.htm

    Leave a comment:


  • chicagorich
    replied
    thanks 111111

    thanks, i have a friend int he hvac industry so i got free sheet metal and some heavy duty industrial oven insulation hopefully that will help. I'm using a 220v on a 60 amp breaker that powers my tig welder so power shouldnt be a problem.

    Leave a comment:

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