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  • Pics of Electric Oven Construction

    Here are some pics of my electric oven construction. It is 3'wide x 4'long x 3' deep in size. I will add more pictures, diagrams and a parts list as I progress. The link to the pics is http://www.stivermotorsports.com/id44.htm
    Hope this helps some of you that are planning to contruct your own. I have a welder, but have designed this oven to involve no welding, so those of you that do not a welder available will be able to construct one.
    Jim

  • #2
    very cool, looks sweet. jeff
    Thier are only two real sports!
    boxing and auto racing
    all the rest are just games.

    Drive it like you stole it!

    Comment


    • #3
      Jim, nice pic's on your site. I like your dimensions and technique! Construction seems very straight forward, but I have 2 questions.

      What do you mean when you say you seal the panels with the furnace cement?

      What is the insulating rating of the insulation? Did you consider using foam panels on the outside as added insulation? Electric costs being what they are this might be worthwhile since the oven will be on for a period of time. Just a thought.

      Comment


      • #4
        asallway,

        High-Temperature Refractory Cement
        This high-temperature cement quickly grips surfaces to form permanent smokeproof and gasproof joints. Ground to a paste-like mortar consistency, this ready-to-use cement can be applied with a trowel or spatula and air dried. It won't shrink or crack. Use it for metal-to-masonry and metal-to-metal joint sealing, and for installing and repairing furnaces, stoves, boilers, heaters, and kilns. Temperature range is 50° to 3000° F. Density is 81 lbs./cu. ft.

        As you can see from the pictures, the panels overlap the ends and bottom. I used this cement to seal the metal panels to the frames and also seal the panels to each other.

        The insulation has a density of 0.5 lbs./cu. ft and a heat flow rate of 0.33 Btu/hr. x in./sq. ft. @75° F. It also has a a temperature range of -40° to +450° F.

        I will wait until I get the oven operational and see what type of heat transfer, if any, that I get to the outside panels before I look into adding additional insulation.

        Jim

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        • #5
          Hey Viper56, I would like to thank you for taking the time to put step by step instructions with pictures. I plan to put my own together soon. Im dying to know what the heat transfer is like. please post any more info as you get it.

          Comment


          • #6
            filburn,

            I just received my digital thermometer and am waiting for the fan motor and blade to be delivered on Monday. I will start adding the electrical components next week and will include additional pics. It should be completed by the end of next week.

            Jim

            Comment


            • #7
              nice site... i would like to see the oven when it is all done.. one qusetion (for now anyways) why would you want a top mount oven? wouldnt it be hard to load heavy parts like a dirtbike frame without disturbing the powder or burning yourself? again thanks for the site and the hlep with oven it is what i am looking for... randy

              Comment


              • #8
                randygrapes218,

                The reason for the top door on my oven is for heavy parts. Since most home-built ovens are not large enough to roll a rack into it, I decided to go with a top mount door. As you can see from the picture below, I have an overhead rail system in my booth which I use to move heavy parts from the front to the rear of the booth without disturbing the part or powder.



                I can either move the part to the back of the booth and use my infrared setup ( which includes a M1500, a M2000 and a Mr. Heater triple) or I will be able to place the oven below and just lower the part into it. I will have a series of brackets mounted around the top of the oven, so I will be able to place lengths of galvanized pipe either lengthwise or across the width of the oven to support the part as to not disturb the coating. I will post pictures of the completed setup, when I am finished. Hopefully by the end of next week.

                Jim

                Comment


                • #9
                  Just updated the oven construction site with more pics.

                  http://www.stivermotorsports.com/id44.htm

                  Waiting for the fan motor and blade to be delivered Monday. The oven should be completed by the end of next week.

                  Jim

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Your work looks good! I am especially interested since I have one under construction.

                    Two questions:

                    Are you not installing a vent? How will the smoke clear or did I miss it.

                    Are installing a 1550 rpm fan motor, it seems like that is very fast. Almost a windy interior and not just "drafty" inside. Is this a common speed to turn a fan in an oven?

                    Thanks,
                    Aaron

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Aaron,

                      I am still working on a vent design and as far as the fan, it will be wired to a variable speed fan switch so that I will be able to control the rpm of the fan. That switch will be mounted in a double gang box along with a separate switch for the oven light.

                      Jim

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                      • #12
                        Your oven is coming along nicely. Where did you find the lightbulb that can handle 400 degrees? Lowes or Home Depot? Also, when you hook up the vent fan will it start to temp down the oven? I mean there has to be cold air coming in to replace the hot smoke filled air that is being sucked out.

                        thanks,
                        mike

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                        • #13
                          Mike,

                          The bulb is a 40w oven bulb from Lowes. You can also get a 100w oven bulb from W.W. Graingers. The fan that I am installing is for circulation and not for exhausting. For the vent and exhaust, I am thinking about putting a piece of galvanized pipe through the bottom of a side panel and one through the top of the opposite side which will go to a collector in a 3" duct and be exhausted outside.

                          JIm

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                          • #14
                            I cant wait to see how you wire it up.
                            Looks nice so far, nice job.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              More updated pictures as of 12-07-04. (Almost completed)

                              http://www.stivermotorsports.com/id44.htm


                              Jay87T,

                              Thanks, I will post detailed pictures of the wiring and a wiring diagram when the project is completed.

                              Jim

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