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Heavy-duty degreasing

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  • customandsound
    Guest replied
    http://www.caswellplating.com/permatex/index.html
    above it the link to caswell's fine product ..

    Leave a comment:


  • kcrails
    replied
    I may have to resort to getting a parts cleaner these things, as they are extra nasty.

    Since I was testing and didn't want to part with more cash than nessecary, I found that this intake fit reasonably well (about 3" sticks out the top) into a 5 gallon bucket, and 4 gallons of the cleaner fills it pretty full. For heat, I initially used two of the "Top Fin" fish tank heaters, then bought a third one because I'm not known to be a patient person. I had to modify the heaters to go about 86-90 degrees, which in this case consisted of pulling the knob off the top and clipping a small piece of plastic out, so the "thermostat" could be set higher. I used a candy thermometer to check temps every so often, in about 45 minutes it got to 120-125 degrees (from the starting 70). I then adjusted the heaters down until I heard the mechanism inside click off. I did keep checking the power cords of the heaters for excessive heat, and did not find any. ***Please note this is not the safest method nor is it recommended. It did work for me but if you try it I'm not responsible.***

    Along these same lines, does anyone know if you can "filter" oil out of cleaners like Simple Green? I know I've seen in parts washers where they have a filter and they suggest it makes the solution last longer.

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  • trsick
    replied
    Re: Heavy-duty degreasing

    Originally posted by kcrails
    Hey all, I've got quite a few parts that have got some heavy grease/oil buildup on them (cam covers, intake manifolds, pistons, timing covers, etc). they're all aluminum, so I don't think I can use a lye mixture. I've been using Simple Green heated to about 120 degrees, which worked great on the first few parts. Now, things are starting to come out with a thin, oily film on 'em. What do you all use to degrease really greasy parts? I think the hot simple green would work well for a final soak, but it's a bit expensive to use for this kind of grease-cutting. BTW, I'm soaking it in the simple green. I've tried spraying and scraping, which works well to a point, but the intake manifolds have pretty long runners, so a soak is the best way I can see to get inside the runners clean. Any suggestions for cheaper degreasing solutions?

    Thanks, Mike
    Hey MIke:
    I read you are heating simple green? Are you doing this in a parts cleaner & how are you heating it?
    Bob

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  • Blademan
    replied
    on really nasty **** I use the cheapest oven cleaner i can find, usually ace hardware has it for $1.00 can...

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  • cruizer
    replied
    This stuff works wonders. I have a 5 gallon bucket under my workbech that i soak parts in overnight. take it out, wash it off, and whola, it's pretty darn clean. Not 100%, but then hit it with a bead blaster and you're set.

    Post edited due to violation of the Terms of Use
    http://www.caswellplating.com/bbs/viewtopic.php?t=1482
    This is a forum for caswell so please keep the other companies name out .
    customandsound

    Leave a comment:


  • seanc
    replied
    Post edited due to violation of the Terms of Use
    http://www.caswellplating.com/bbs/viewtopic.php?t=1482
    This is a forum for caswell so please keep the other companies name out .

    Leave a comment:


  • kcrails
    started a topic Heavy-duty degreasing

    Heavy-duty degreasing

    Hey all, I've got quite a few parts that have got some heavy grease/oil buildup on them (cam covers, intake manifolds, pistons, timing covers, etc). they're all aluminum, so I don't think I can use a lye mixture. I've been using Simple Green heated to about 120 degrees, which worked great on the first few parts. Now, things are starting to come out with a thin, oily film on 'em. What do you all use to degrease really greasy parts? I think the hot simple green would work well for a final soak, but it's a bit expensive to use for this kind of grease-cutting. BTW, I'm soaking it in the simple green. I've tried spraying and scraping, which works well to a point, but the intake manifolds have pretty long runners, so a soak is the best way I can see to get inside the runners clean. Any suggestions for cheaper degreasing solutions?

    Thanks, Mike
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