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  • Marine application

    I need an expert advice. A friend of mine (after seeing my TB spacer) asked if I can powder coat an aluminum propeller from his boat? Without thinking replied ofcourse!
    After looking at, I don't see any sealer, bearing, plastic or rubber in it, so far so good! I have to strip the black (non marine) paint, prepare the surface, coat and bake, right?
    He wants it shiny black, so my question is: what caswell black is good for marine application, or do I use clear after black is applied

    Thanks for your time

    frank

  • #2
    i cant say for sure but i would feel safe using black magic and then clear coat.
    when in doubt polish it out/ why replace it when you can refinish it
    G2 Polishing and Powdercoating

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    • #3
      Re: Marine application

      Originally posted by Netnut
      I need an expert advice. A friend of mine (after seeing my TB spacer) asked if I can powder coat an aluminum propeller from his boat? Without thinking replied ofcourse!
      After looking at, I don't see any sealer, bearing, plastic or rubber in it, so far so good! I have to strip the black (non marine) paint, prepare the surface, coat and bake, right?
      He wants it shiny black, so my question is: what caswell black is good for marine application, or do I use clear after black is applied

      Thanks for your time

      frank
      Hey Frank:
      I do a ton of items that go into the ocean. ALL ocean applications need a "Zinc Rich Primer". This is a powder primer. After proper prep, you shoot the item with the primer, put it in the oven for ONLY roughly 3 minutes (until the primer gels). Remove from oven & let cool to roughly 140F & then shoot the top color & cure as directed for the top color.
      Good Luck
      Bob
      www.capecodpowdercoating.com

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      • #4
        that is right up your alley bob...

        But the magic black and clear to add depth to the powder is your best bet. unless you use a mirror black with a 500+ clear..
        like these:


        i try to clear as much as i can if the customer is willing to pay a few more buck's it look's alot better and the clear will help on the micro scratches that will show on the darker color

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        • #5
          Thanks for the advise Bob,

          I'll try your process, and post pics after it's finished

          fr

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          • #6
            I am almost 100% sure all aluminum props have a rubber insert between the hub and blades. I know stainless props come in both solid hubs and non. You should check with the company the made the prop.

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            • #7
              I saw only 2 set of numbers but no manufacturer ID...
              I'll call up some boat rebuilders and pick they brain

              fr

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              • #8
                bob maybe able to help you out a little on that ..

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                • #9
                  We talked to the boat rebuilder, and he assured us there is NO rubber itside! So I went ahead, stripped, preheated, coated and here is the finish product:
                  http://www.caswellplating.com/bbs/al...php?pic_id=590

                  but I am not soooo happy about it because as you can see on the next picture, on one side and the upper part of the rim is look like "foggy". I thought it's not cured properly, so I flipped it around in the oven and let sit for another 15 minutes @300F , but no luck!
                  http://www.caswellplating.com/bbs/al...php?pic_id=592

                  Can you tell me why is it foggy
                  Maybe in those areas the clear coat is thicker?
                  The owner was happy, didn't say nothing yet, it was free for him. Should I strip it and re-coat?
                  After you take the part out of the oven, how soon you see orange peel, or yellowis discolorisation?

                  frank

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                  • #10
                    Hey Netnut. It's tough to tell by just looking at the picture but I wonder if you have a condition called blooming. I'm not completely sure what causes it(something in the manufacturing process of the powder) but I've seen it in candies and clears. Basically the part developes an inconsistant almost blotchy haze. Almost looks like frost, but has no texture to it. Well if that's it, the only way to get rid of it is by reshooting the part.

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                    • #11
                      Thanks bzer1!!!

                      Just goggled blooming and come up with the answer
                      Some place call it "haze" caused by traped in solvent but i swear it was oil, and solvent free

                      Live and learn

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                      • #12
                        look's good what color?

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                        • #13
                          It's a flat black, holographic pigment mixed in the top coat...
                          He showed to 5-6 people and heard nothing else just UUUhhs an AAAhhs
                          We are taking the boat out on the weekend to see if he gained some horses becauseof the smooth surface

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