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  • How much powder?

    I have not started to powder coat yet but just trying to get an idea of how much powder it takes to do items. Lets say I wanted to powder coat 4 17" rims how many pounds of powder would I want to buy for this project?

    Thx
    Mike

  • #2
    Re: How much powder?

    i wouldn't buy less then 2 pounds, 2 pounds should get the job done, this is a guess, i have never done rims before, i bet some of these guys on here could do it all with one pound though.

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    • #3
      Re: How much powder?

      I just coated a set of 4 17" steel rims today, and put on 4 coats on each rim, this was with 2 pounds of powder using a ITW Gema pro gun which wastes alot more powder then the hobby

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      • #4
        Re: How much powder?

        Originally posted by tavo1765
        I just coated a set of 4 17" steel rims today, and put on 4 coats on each rim, this was with 2 pounds of powder using a ITW Gema pro gun which wastes alot more powder then the hobby

        Did you cure each coat fully? Is it necessary to put multiple coats on wheels or is it just for added durability?

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        • #5
          Re: How much powder?

          Isnt 4 coats quite overkill and a waste?

          I can see two coats as a security thing... but anymore than that I see as a waste.

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          • #6
            Re: How much powder?

            Actually multi coating is a very good technique to use when doing tins...Especially if you're shooting a candy top coat. It does however take a great deal of practice. Shooting solids on wheels should not be much different, although I would shy away if you're shooting a metallic. If you're looking for an incredibly rich deep coating I'm with tavo on this one. There is a techinque in liquid painting called flash coating that's bascially the same. Several thin coats appear much thicker and have more depth than a single coat of the same thickness. A word of caution though...You really need to practice to get it right. The way it works on tins is: After a good outgassing let your parts cool and spray a thin but even coat, then a partial cure. Remove the part from the oven and let it mostly cool and spray a thin but even coat and another partial cure. repeat the process until you have a good thick even coat and complete the cure...If you do it right the surface will look like you're looking through about 4 inches of candy, when you're really only looking at about 1.5 to 2.5 mils.
            Last edited by bzer1; 09-27-2005, 03:10 PM.

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