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  • Curing powder coat

    I'm geting closer to purchasing a powder coat system. The only problem i have is the curing process. I'm finding it difficult to find an electric oven so i am thinking about purchasing a curing lamp. Which one would you suggest using to cure valve covers mostly. Would the 1000 watt one work alright? Also, how many amps and volts is this lamp? I want to make sure its not an electric eating curing source. Thanks

  • #2
    I mean the $188.50 1500watt curing lamp.

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    • #3
      cheap oven

      An electric household oven works well, they are cheap and often free if you look in the right front yards. The only part that need work is the oven itself. Most home ovens are large enough for valve covers. You can make an oven cheaply if you want more room. Make a sheet metal box, then insulate it with fiberglass house insulation(you must remove vapor barrier from insulation) the fiberglass will easily handle 400 degrees. Then grab a donor oven and take the controlls and heating elements and transfer them to the new box. Don't forget to put a small vent in oven to allow for expansion. Don't invest much in building your first oven cause your projects will outgrow it before you know it.
      Heat lamps don't work well, they are very uneven and take forever to do even small parts, plus temperature control is very difficult.

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      • #4
        Hi Dale:

        While I agree with you that an electric oven is a great curing tool (we always encourage our customers to try a low cost solution before purchasing specialized equipment), I disagree that the curing lamps are not effective.

        The infrared curing lamps we sell are specially made for curing powder coating and have proven themselves time and time again as effective and easy to use.

        I'll get the details on the lamp and post them when I have them.
        --
        Mike Caswell
        Caswell Inc
        http://www.caswellplating.com
        Need Support? Visit our online support section at http://support.caswellplating.com

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        • #5
          I apprecaite the advice and info. When you get the info on the lamps i'd appreciate that aswell. Also, off topic, what is the approimate area that 1lb. of powder coat will cover?

          Thanks

          Tom

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          • #6
            low cost

            Caswell--- Please tell me what your idea of a low cost start up is?
            I paid $10.00 for my first oven at a garage sale, my second oven was twice the sized purchased at an auction, third oven was $600.00 at a used resturant supply wharehouse and 2 adults can stand in it at the same time.

            As for your curing lamps, we both know that the final color of the powder is heavily influenced by cure time and temperature. Especially white which turns off white if cured too long or if temp too high. Now try to cure a box 2 foot square, using lamps you have 2 choices, curing one side at a time, or curing all sides with additional lamps. If you cure one side at a time will all the sides match? Maybe if you use a temperature gun to moniter the surface temp. If you add additional lamps you defeat the low cost.

            I only suggest an oven because it makes curing much easier for new coaters by being consistent.

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            • #7
              I only suggest an oven because it makes curing much easier for new coaters by being consistent.
              As I mentioned, we also suggest ovens for our customers, if you read our Powder Coating product info page:

              http://www.caswellplating.com/powder_coat.htm

              "The part is then placed in an dedicated electric oven, and baked for a while. This cures the coating to a tough chemical resistant finish. It is important not to use a gas oven, as the emissions from the coating are flammable."

              Low cost is a relative term. Some people think $100 is a lot of money, others are willing to spend $1000's to startup. It depends on their resources and goals. We need to cater to both.

              You said that curing lamps don't work well, and that's simply not true. If they weren't effective, people wouldn't use them.

              You're perfectly welcome to post your advice and opinions here, but if you want to dump OUR products on OUR forum, we obviously won't appreciate it.

              Since we're now straying off topic, let's please end this thread.
              --
              Mike Caswell
              Caswell Inc
              http://www.caswellplating.com
              Need Support? Visit our online support section at http://support.caswellplating.com

              Comment


              • #8
                1000 watt @ 110 volts = 9 amps
                --
                Mike Caswell
                Caswell Inc
                http://www.caswellplating.com
                Need Support? Visit our online support section at http://support.caswellplating.com

                Comment


                • #9
                  final reply

                  My intent is not to dump your products, but my intent is also not to sell your products.Having said that let's return to helping people.

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                  • #10
                    using oven instead of torch - not dangerous??

                    Hello.

                    You all say that a normal kitchen oven works fine. The grill may be 1000 degrees, but the air is 400.

                    How about a toaster?

                    Why not use a torch. The only reason it would be more likely to burn is because a propane torch reachers 3000C. So why not just use a low temp sooty flame or hot air gun? If all else fails, i plan to heat my frame FROM THE INSIDE using a torch...

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                    • #11
                      Here's my opinion, and it's just only that. We have a elec. oven which we made bigger, thats what we mainly use.
                      I also got a m1500 lamp and it works ok. Just seems to take a little longer. I tried my hot head propane heater and it kinda worked the same.
                      Key is to mointer the temp. with an IR gun. I got the same one they sell here and its well worth the coin at getting a good finished product.

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                      • #12
                        Re: using oven instead of torch - not dangerous??

                        Originally posted by armani
                        Hello.

                        You all say that a normal kitchen oven works fine. The grill may be 1000 degrees, but the air is 400.

                        How about a toaster?

                        Why not use a torch. The only reason it would be more likely to burn is because a propane torch reachers 3000C. So why not just use a low temp sooty flame or hot air gun? If all else fails, i plan to heat my frame FROM THE INSIDE using a torch...
                        Armani, I don't think it would be a great idea to use a propane torch. Plus having to hold the torch in one spot for 25 minutes would be quite time consuming. Personally I use a Toaster Oven and a Triple Mr. Heater(IR Propane Heater).

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                        • #13
                          I use a kitchen oven. I will be upgrading to an industrial oven soon, but will also be picking up an IR lamp for larger flat objects. I've seen the lamps work and in my humble opinion they do work well. If you have patience and take care in checking the temp and moving the lamp as needed you will have a positive outcome.

                          Armani
                          I wouldn't advise using a torch. You could end up getting a Darwin award. I have seen people use a toaster oven with great success when coating small parts.

                          The bottom line is that you can use a kitchen oven or an IR lamp with great success. Use what ever method fits your situation. If you only have a 110v 20a circuit you'll be using an IR lamp. If you have 220 100a use what ever you can afford. If you have little room to work with you will be better off with the IR lamp, as it is portable. You can also add to it using another lamp after you get a good work flow going. Just remember that you do need to be patient and diligent when it come to material temp.

                          Good luck.

                          tomg552001, Where in NJ are you from?

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                          • #14
                            Wow, a year and a half year old post i made . I am in northern NJ.

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                            • #15
                              I am as well. I never even looked at the date on the post. I was wondering why you said you were getting closer to purchasing equipment. I've been out on your site, and I have to say...NICE WORK! Where in northern NJ ? I'm in Parsippany

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