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  • about the curing lamps...

    Hi,

    I just recently bought and recieved the kit and I'm collecting the stuff I didn't buy the first time :P

    About the lamps...what's the difference between the medium and short wave lamps? Why would I choose one over the other?

    Also, about curing parts with ovens and lamps...how bad are the vapors? Is it 'heavy' or kinda 'light' vapors that dissipate quickly?

    Thanks!

    -T

  • #2
    Re: about the curing lamps...

    Originally posted by trest
    Hi,

    I just recently bought and recieved the kit and I'm collecting the stuff I didn't buy the first time :P

    About the lamps...what's the difference between the medium and short wave lamps? Why would I choose one over the other?

    Also, about curing parts with ovens and lamps...how bad are the vapors? Is it 'heavy' or kinda 'light' vapors that dissipate quickly?

    Thanks!

    -T

    Here how I think it is...

    Short wave: quick, low watt but hard on you powder. Sometimes it actually hardenes the powder before it has floated out completely. It also can make the powder very "waterlike" so if you have applied a little to much you can get flow marks. I think this is best if finish isn`t the ultimate demand.

    Medium wave: not so quick as short wave but much quicker than an el. oven. Gives the powder much more time to get the flow/surface right. If you for example have some oil/pockets of air in your subject the medium wave may give it time to evaporate before closing the film. Or else you`ll get a pinnhole or a crater.

    All and all IR curing is great for curing big subjects in different stages.

    I prefer the electrical oven myself, because it is easyer to control the curing prosess. If you for example have a subject that is porous, as for example cast iron. You have the possibility to start the curing prosess at 100 degres and slowly move upwards in temperature. That way you give the powder film the opportunity to breathe out all contamination in the substrate and get an even finish. That is not so easy if you use IR for curing. The el oven also heats up the whole subject from the inside, that`s why it takes longer time, but that also gives the opportunity to cure complex subjects (regarding geometry) profiles and metal fixtures. The IR only cures what it actually hits with its infrared beams.

    Regarding vapors is a nother feather in the hat for the el oven, you either keep them inside the oven or let it breathe out tru a channel into free air.
    But the vapors isn`t bad when using IR either, passive smoking is much more dangerous
    Did you know that it is possible to use every gram of powder if you recycle when coating, and vapors are almost none !
    In a wet paint approx. 80-90 % evaporates into the air. Causing stress on the enviroment !
    1 kg. of powder can cover approx. 10-12 m3
    1 litre. of wet paint covers approx. 2-3 m3

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    • #3
      ahhh right on

      Excellent. That's exaclty what I wanted to know and more thanks!

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      • #4
        Just glad my info could help you...
        Did you know that it is possible to use every gram of powder if you recycle when coating, and vapors are almost none !
        In a wet paint approx. 80-90 % evaporates into the air. Causing stress on the enviroment !
        1 kg. of powder can cover approx. 10-12 m3
        1 litre. of wet paint covers approx. 2-3 m3

        Comment


        • #5
          Want more information

          Hi guys,

          Pardon my ignorance, but I want to know more about these IR lamps. It doesn't matter on size of what you're powdercoating with these lamps? I know it's a stupid question, but I wanted to ask first.

          I'm thinking of powdercoating rims that are kinda big. I'm debating if the IR lamp is very good at curing all powdercoated metals, as I don't have room for an electric oven where I live.

          Any other input would be greatly appreciated,

          Stan

          Comment


          • #6
            I just powder coated my oil pan using a hardware store variety quartz heater. It worked very well. Since the oil pan is only coated on the outside, I used my heat gun on the inside of the pan to get the nooks and crannies up to temp without overheating the large flat panels. Worked great. I was impressed how easy it was.

            Hemi-T

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