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BTU Calculator

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  • BTU Calculator

    this is a great tool for the oven build forum can it be made into a sticky by the mods or can mike or lance take care of this.

    http://www.tupent.com/shop/heaters_1...btu-calculator
    Last edited by lcaswell; 12-06-2013, 12:31 PM. Reason: changed title
    when in doubt polish it out/ why replace it when you can refinish it
    G2 Polishing and Powdercoating

  • #2
    re: BTU Calculator

    I'm not sure how to enter the info. into the boxes on the calculator. I hope I don't sound stupid but my oven I want to build would be 3'x4'x6'. So I entered in the square footage 3' x4' and ceiling height 6' is this right?


    Originally posted by pickleboy View Post
    this is a great tool for the oven build forum can it be made into a sticky by the mods or can mike or lance take care of this.
    http://www.heatershop.com/btu_calculator.htm
    Harley
    Restoration is not a way of life, it's a way to bring new life.

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    • #3
      re: BTU Calculator

      Originally posted by hjeades View Post
      I'm not sure how to enter the info. into the boxes on the calculator. I hope I don't sound stupid but my oven I want to build would be 3'x4'x6'. So I entered in the square footage 3' x4' and ceiling height 6' is this right?




      Yes that will work.
      Mike

      MJM Powder Coating

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      • #4
        Re: BTU Calculator

        What do you put in where it says "Fahrenheit temperature increase"?

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        • #5
          Re: BTU Calculator

          Originally posted by everette View Post
          What do you put in where it says "Fahrenheit temperature increase"?
          If the ambient temp is 60 degrees and you want to heat to 400 then enter 340(400-60).

          Use this as a general guide only. I personally don't feel it is that accurate.

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          • #6
            Re: BTU Calculator

            Here is a link to another calculator that imo gives more accurate estimations:

            http://forum.caswellplating.com/oven...alculator.html

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            • #7
              Re: BTU Calculator

              Interesting calculator.. I am having a custom made element quoted from a manufacture and they informed me that most element companies calculate in watts per square inch... I was told they don't use the BTU measurement any longer... Just thought I'd pass that along..
              If it jams; Force it. And if it breaks it needed replacing anyway.

              I can go from 0 to "What seems to be the problem Officer?" in 3 seconds."

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              • #8
                Re: BTU Calculator

                Hi This link is no longer there, maybe time to remove it as a sticky

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                • #9
                  Re: BTU Calculator

                  The link needs to be modified, It's only 2 clicks from there still... Here's the new link.
                  Heaters. Residential and commercial from name brands you can trust like Mr. Heater and DeLonghi. Electric | diesel | kerosene | propane LPG or natural gas NG.
                  sigpic

                  See photos of my work on Facebook "Scottrods Powder Coating"

                  EMAIL [email protected]

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                  • #10
                    Re: BTU Calculator

                    Another Failed link... Hmf...

                    Here's a same calculator... different place. BTU Calculator
                    sigpic

                    See photos of my work on Facebook "Scottrods Powder Coating"

                    EMAIL [email protected]

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                    • #11
                      Often on this and other forums people state they are looking to build an oven of a certain size, often quite large without first considering if they have the electrical service to power it. The calculators are fine, but a very simple way is to just calculate watts per cubic feet, or watts per cubic meters. Generally around 150 watts per cubic foot is optimal, based on standard R13 insulation and desired heat up times of around 15 minutes. If your ambient temperatures in winter are very low then adjust these numbers upward.

                      Once you have determined the necessary wattage then compute this to amperes. This is accomplished by dividing the computed wattage by voltage, or 240 in the U.S. Lastly look at your electrical service panel. If your computed amperage draw is 100 amps and you have a 60 amp sub panel then obviously this isn't going to be possible. If unsure, seek the opinion of a qualified electrician.

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