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Ceramic Coating Oven (Thermostat)

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  • Ceramic Coating Oven (Thermostat)

    I'm building a 2nd oven for Ceramic coatings.
    So I need to get pretty hot, higher than a normal household oven will get.
    In my previous oven I've used the standard household oven thermostat and it's worked good for me.
    However, I can't use it for the new oven because of the max temp setting.

    What can I use in it's place, needs to be 120V for my contactor coil, which is probably standard.
    Part numbers and prices for the complete setup (thermostat and probe) would be awesome.

    Thanks in advance...
    Last edited by itsallgood; 02-25-2008, 12:46 AM.

  • #2
    Re: Ceramic Coating Oven (Thermostat)

    Most PID controllers can display temperature values into 4 digits and a 'K' thermocoupler can report temperatures to around 2400F. Most if not all PIDs can be configured to operate a 120vac contactor.

    Look for these parts at auber instruments or on ebay.
    Last edited by ed_denu; 02-25-2008, 08:39 AM.

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    • #3
      Re: Ceramic Coating Oven (Thermostat)

      Like mentioned, go with a PID controller and thermcouple. You can buy these together on Ebay for less than $50.

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      • #4
        Re: Ceramic Coating Oven (Thermostat)

        Yeah, you really can't beat the PIDs for temperature control. They're good for +/- one degree. I'm accumulating PIDs (as fund$ allow) to replace all my plating tank controls and melting pot controls. If I could find some kind of gas control valve with auto ignition, I'd put one on my metal furnace.

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        • #5
          Re: Ceramic Coating Oven (Thermostat)

          So these two things shoudl be all I need...for controlling my contactor 120V Coil 50Amp Contactor.

          http://auberins.com/index.php?main_p...products_id=14
          http://auberins.com/index.php?main_p...products_id=27

          If so, count me in...that's pretty cheap, I should have went that way for my first oven.

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          • #6
            Re: Ceramic Coating Oven (Thermostat)

            Yes sir, that should do it. Well that and a box to make your connections. I noticed the TC probe doesn't look like is has a threaded mount so some sort of high temp grommet may be need to secure the probe. Also note--That probe is good to only 750*F. Don't know what your ceramics are curing at but this may be a problem. Others are available to handle higher temperatures.

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            • #7
              Re: Ceramic Coating Oven (Thermostat)

              Thanks a ton...
              I'll make sure to get the higher temp TC.

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              • #8
                Re: Ceramic Coating Oven (Thermostat)

                As far as curring temps for ceramic, in most cases you don't need to cure them at a very high temp. I cure all the time between 525 - 600. Which is plenty according to the instructions that come with the ceramic.

                Who says you can't teach an ole dog new tricks?

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                • #9
                  Re: Ceramic Coating Oven (Thermostat)

                  Yeah just go with PID controller and thermocouple, search some online stores...


                  _________________
                  Thermostat

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                  • #10
                    Re: Ceramic Coating Oven (Thermostat)

                    Originally posted by CarWiz View Post
                    Yeah, you really can't beat the PIDs for temperature control. They're good for +/- one degree. I'm accumulating PIDs (as fund$ allow) to replace all my plating tank controls and melting pot controls. If I could find some kind of gas control valve with auto ignition, I'd put one on my metal furnace.
                    Melting pots! Are you casting your own parts?

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                    • #11
                      Re: Ceramic Coating Oven (Thermostat)

                      Originally posted by ed_denu View Post
                      Melting pots! Are you casting your own parts?
                      Wow, this thread is a year old but yes I do. Also pour babbitt for old auto engine bearings. Most of my casting is aluminum auto parts or die-cast badges when they can't be found. A few plastic parts too like horn ring centers, tail light lenses, etc. The largest cast part I've made is a die-cast headlight bucket for a 1936 Cord.

                      I haven't got enough nerve up to try steel and iron yet. Haven't run across a fire suit I can afford yet either. Had a magnesium fire once. That scared the living **** out of me. If anyone says dirt doesn't burn, they lie. It made glass and powder out of my sand pit and burned about 6-8" into the ground. Had to just let it go until it burned out. Won't try that again without a vacuum furnace.

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