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Advice on chopping up a double oven to make a single? And other questions...

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  • Advice on chopping up a double oven to make a single? And other questions...

    I had a 30" oven that was fully digital (got it for $12! Just needed an element), but I left it plugged in, which I NEVER do but I just forgot, and of course lighting struck and apparently fried the control panel. New panel is $300+, so another oven was definitely the best option.

    I found a 30" double oven on CL for $85. Pretty nice shape, it's got knobs so no control panels to worry about. I picked it up and took the doors off and the exterior panels. Im about ready to cut out the center section and make it into one oven. Im going to use the top oven's broil element and the bottom ovens bake element, and possibly incoprorate some kind of fan if necessary. What would you recommend on patching up the holes? Im sure I can re-use the metal that I cut out, but should I just use sheet metal screws? Should I use some sort of sealer around the patch panels?

    2 more questions kinda on the same topic:

    A. How come the 30" I had before measures 25" inside width, but this one I have (and another that I have looked at) measures 22.5" inside? Thought that was a little peculiar.

    B. If sometime down the line I finally do make my own oven, and I still only use two elements, could I basically transfer all the components and wiring from the "single" double oven to my new fab'd oven? I know the bulk of the money is going to be in the actual framing and structural part of the oven, so if I can cut costs on the electronics by reusing what I already have then Im definitely going to try it.

  • #2
    Re: Advice on chopping up a double oven to make a single? And other questions...

    I think your best bet would be to weld the patch panels in so you don't have to worry about leaks.

    A... Not sure

    B... Yes you could incorporate all of the electronics into the new oven. It should be pretty simple.
    I am a big fan of Murphy "whatever can go wrong will"

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    • #3
      Re: Advice on chopping up a double oven to make a single? And other questions...

      I used the elements from a couple of ovens as well as SOME of the wiring. I bought some Hi-temp wire to run from the elements to the contactor. I bought a contactor and a PID w/thermocouple. The controls and thermocouple in a house oven are not that accurate for temp control. So, do yourself a favor and get those two items.
      Who says you can't teach an ole dog new tricks?

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      • #4
        Re: Advice on chopping up a double oven to make a single? And other questions...

        thanks for the reponses guys. I dont have access to a welder per-say, so I would like to try and avoid that, though to me that would be the ideal way to seal up the patches. I wonder if they make some kind of sealer for fireplaces or something. Or what about taking some foil tape and putting it around the seams? I know this may look trashy, and Im not sure how much heat it would take before either burning or loosing its adhesion properties, but if it works then I might give it a shot.

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        • #5
          Re: Advice on chopping up a double oven to make a single? And other questions...

          I used fireplace caulk from Lowes its good up to 2000*F and its cheap. After I used it JTW97 told me about some that stays flexible which I would have much rather used. The link he gave me has expired but its called Rutland Red RTV 600 degree High Heat Silicone Sealant if you can find it. The foil tape says it is good to 200*F but I heated it with a torch and it held up to far more than an oven will reach before the adhesive liquefied. I covered all of my rivet seams with it. I will let you know how it goes when I fire it up for the first time.
          I am a big fan of Murphy "whatever can go wrong will"

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          • #6
            Re: Advice on chopping up a double oven to make a single? And other questions...

            Thats what i did! I cut out the center section of my double oven i got for free on CL. Long story short it works good....Now. I found a 70 degree difference between the top and bottom of the oven when standing normally. Tilted it on its side, problem mostly solved. But when i got within 6" of the elements I would get extreme hot spots. That made my usable area very small. I had to put fire brick on the bottom to get it to work. It takes an hour and a half to reach 400... the price i have to pay to get it right. Now I can be an inch off the brick no problem.

            I also changed the way the door opened and that was its own set of challenges.

            I had to calibrate the oven, because 400 degrees is almost 500 on the dial. the other one is at about 450 to get 400. Get a convection oven fan as it was the only way to eliminate the hot spots.

            The racking is difficult now, the way its pictured here is not the way I would do it again. I welded two small racks into one large one and usually hang stuff from it. I would use existing racks and weld them into the oven on their side. Easy and simple.

            Over all dimensions are 35"L x 18"D x 19"H. Its too bad I can't fit any 18" rims in here... DOH!

            Make sure you brace the oven together before you cut anything apart. I didn't any everything got out of square. Pain in the arse. U can use the high temp caulking but it cracks and flakes off if its near the elements. Plus it gives off a funky oder that I'm sure isn't good for me.


            Hey after its all said and done I got about 70 bucks in it. Put a vent hood on top to suck out the hot air.


            I just realized the pics suck, but I'll take new ones with the fire brick in there if you want.

            Good luck, I have about 40 hours into tweaking this baby. She's ugly, put she puts out.
            Attached Files
            Last edited by rbroker; 09-29-2008, 11:09 PM.

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            • #7
              Re: Advice on chopping up a double oven to make a single? And other questions...

              I just read you don't have a welder.

              Your F'd without one.

              One more pic.
              Attached Files

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              • #8
                Re: Advice on chopping up a double oven to make a single? And other questions...

                rbroker does that thing leak or what. how many watts are you running, that thing should heat up a little faster than that. I have a 7' x 4' x 2.5' @ 9000Watts for motorcycle frames and such, and it heats up in an hour with leaky seals in the doors.
                I am a big fan of Murphy "whatever can go wrong will"

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                • #9
                  Re: Advice on chopping up a double oven to make a single? And other questions...

                  Originally posted by rbroker View Post
                  U can use the high temp caulking but it cracks and flakes off if its near the elements. Plus it gives off a funky oder that I'm sure isn't good for me.
                  There is two other caulks that work pretty good and don't flake off. I have used the Red, but there is a black. They are rubberized and stay put with NO flaking. I found mine at Menard's, but you can get it on line. Only problem is some of it comes in a nine pack, I think. But look around locally and see if you can find it.

                  Here is a couple of statements about it.

                  500 F. heat resistant silicone sealant forms a tough, rubbery adhesive seal that withstands 450 F. continuously and 500 F. intermittently. Uses include: sealing fireplace inserts, stoves, flashings, solar panel repairs - anywhere a black or translucent permanent elastic seal is needed. Adheres to most materials. Acetoxy cure. Meets ASTM C920-86. 10.5 oz. cartridge.

                  No. 76: BlackNo. 76C: Translucent


                  Rutland 600 RTV super red high-heat silicone sealant is a neutral cure (no odor) ultra-performance sealant. Without harsh odor, it's the perfect choice for application in confined areas. It forms a tough rubbery seal, and keeps it's flexibility even in heat enviroments of up to 550 F. continuous and 600 F. intermittent. It adheres to glass, metal, plastic, fiberglass, aluminum, wood, brick, and slate. Greatly improved adhesion to masonry makes it the ideal choice on chimneys and flashings. Its neutral cure prevents corrosion on copper or galvanized chimney flashings.

                  Here is the link on these.
                  Shop by brands at doitbest.com, The World's Largest Hardware StoreĀ®

                  Hope it helps. I'll post in the oven build sticky as well.
                  Who says you can't teach an ole dog new tricks?

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                  • #10
                    Re: Advice on chopping up a double oven to make a single? And other questions...

                    Originally posted by rbroker View Post
                    I just read you don't have a welder.

                    Your F'd without one.

                    One more pic.
                    Actually, no Im not. Im hinging the last door today and Im done. You dont need a welder, though it would make it a little easier, it isn't essential.

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                    • #11
                      Re: Advice on chopping up a double oven to make a single? And other questions...

                      I used the yellow 3M fireplace caulking. I used it to fill the gaps in the rubber seal from cutting it all part. They eventually turn brown and hard, and while they have stayed put, I have seen some minor cracks and some smaller pieces flake off.

                      I haven't the slightest idea what wattage I'm running. Whatever came with the oven is what I'm using. No manual or idea what brand it is. Without the fire brick it took about 15 min to hit temp. With the fire brick on top of the elements it takes an hour and a half. It has to heat those up so the heat gets through to the rest of the oven. But once it gets there it doesn't fluctuate more than a few degrees.

                      I'm impressed that you did this without a welder!

                      I hope its on your to buy list because I don't know what I would have done without one. Drywall screws and duct tape can only go so far.

                      Rob

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                      • #12
                        Re: Advice on chopping up a double oven to make a single? And other questions...

                        Ive been looking at getting a welder for a while now, but I wanna spend some $$$ and get a good one instead of a cheap home depot one. But times are tough now, and I just got laid off last week

                        It wasn't that hard though without a welder. Im not sure how most ovens are made, but my double oven had "bins" basically that was the actually oven enclosure. I took those out and chopped off one side, then cut the center bar on the frame of the oven. Then got a long piano hinge from home depot, screwed that into both doors, and then removed the factory hinges. Now I jsut have to seal the doors a little better and wire it all up.

                        Have you put in a circulating fan in your oven yet? I figured that would help out with the hot/cold spots and you should be able to use the oven without the fire brick.

                        Also, when you had your oven standing up, how many elements were you running? I was thinking of running the bottom bake and top broil elements, but I didn't realize that the track I put in obstructs the top element. Isn't there a calculator on here that says what size element I would need for a certain space? I have NO idea what wattage elements I have now, but so far I've got 3 broil elements and 4 bake elements, all unknown wattages.

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                        • #13
                          Re: Advice on chopping up a double oven to make a single? And other questions...

                          The fan evened out the heat to a plus or minus 15 degrees without bricks, still to much variation in my book. I put the fire brick in so I could utilize the bottom 6 inches of the oven, without it..my usable area was very tiny and I was getting cloudy powder from over heating. It was a 35 x 10H x 18 oven at that point. You can't do much with that narrow space.

                          The bottom of a peice close to the burners would be 575 degrees, and the top just 10 inchs taller would be at 400. Now its the same from top to bottom, plus or minus 5 or so.

                          I had two elements on the bottom when it was standing upright. At the time, running a top element didn't occur to me. Now I wish I would have done so.

                          I moved the factory hinges from the bottom of the door, to what would be the right side. It was a major pain, I couldn't find industrial dishwasher hinges cheap enough.

                          There are BTU calculators posted. Being that I haven't a clue what brand or what wattage Im running, I'll have to make due until the money tree starts sprouting bills again.

                          In terms of welders, I got a Lincoln 180C. The C has infinite adjustablilty. Its a 220V and it works awesome, couldn't be happier with it. I got mine on ebay with a "free" cart. Talk to a welding supplier they might be able to give you a better deal for used equiptment if you pay cash. wink wink. Thats what they told me at least.
                          Last edited by rbroker; 10-01-2008, 10:19 AM.

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                          • #14
                            Re: Advice on chopping up a double oven to make a single? And other questions...

                            Ok, Im ready to wire this thing to the wall finally! Only thing I have left is to figure out how to wire up the elements. I had thought about laying the oven down on its side, but I dont wanna have to fab up some sort of racking system again, and then I would have to place the elements on the original grooves for the racks. So for now Im leaving it standing. Dimensions are appx 48"x16"x23" (Just guessin, I havent measured it exactly since I chopped it up). I was thinking about having one element on the bottom, and then two on the sides. All the original controls are left intact, so I have control of 2 broil and 2 bake elements. Could I wire it so that the original bottom bake element runs the one element on the bottom, and then splice the wires for the original top oven bake element to the elements Im putting in on the side? I still have two temp probes, so I would assume that even if I use the original circuitry, it should cut off once it reached its set temperature. Did I confuse anyone yet?

                            I will try to get some pics tonight after school to show how everything is setup, as well as a diagram of what Im talking about as far as wiring.

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                            • #15
                              Re: Advice on chopping up a double oven to make a single? And other questions...

                              got some pics, Im gonna work on a diagram to show what Im talking about as far as wiring goes.
                              Attached Files

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